Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals

Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals.

Results 1 - 20 of 553 in Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals

  1. Letter of the week: Holland hurts UVU core values with marriage briefRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | Salt Lake Tribune

    George Pyle wrote Sunday in the Salt Lake Tribune that Gene Schaerr, the lawyer hired by the state of Utah to argue against marriage equality in the 10th Circuit Court of Appeals, has filed an amicus brief in the Supreme Court case and has done so for "100 scholars of marriage." Pyle noted that among the 100 are 13 with connections to Utah, including, "most notably, Matthew Holland, the president of Utah Valley University."

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  2. Federal appeals court upholds city prohibition on park Nativity sceneRead the original story

    Friday | Jurist

    The committee had been granted a "winter display" exception from the city's 1994 law banning all unattended displays, but amidst religious controversy that exception was revoked in 2012. In dismissing the committee's complaint that the ordinance violated their First Amendment [text] rights, the court stated, "[t]he repeal [of the exception] was a content-neutral time, place, and manner regulation," and was therefore not a violation of the group's right to free speech.

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  3. High Court to Review Time Limit for Filing Constructive Discharge ClaimRead the original story

    Friday | HR Magazine

    The U.S. Supreme Court agreed on April 27, 2015, to decide whether the filing period under Title VII of the 1964 Civil Rights Act for a constructive discharge claim begins to run when the employee resigns or when the employer commits the last allegedly discriminatory act leading to the resignation . Individuals seeking to file employment discrimination suits under Title VII and most other federal employment discrimination statutes must first exhaust their administrative remedies.

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  4. Two Out of Three Ain't Bad: Kansas District Court Certifies...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Apr 30 | JD Supra

    A boy fell through the vinyl guardrail his father installed on the second story deck of their home. After settling his son's personal injury claims, the father sued Home Depot and the guardrail manufacturer on behalf of himself and other Kansas purchasers for breach of warranty and violations of the Kansas Consumer Protection Act alleging that the guardrail brackets were defective.

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  5. There Is Growing Evidence Noncitizens Are Voting. Why Isn't the Government Doing Anything?Read the original story

    Thursday Apr 30 | PressReleasePoint

    ... filed by Kansas and Arizona seeking to overturn a bad decision on this issue by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals. Last February, the Heritage Foundation's Hans A. von Spakovsky spoke before a House committee and provided examples of foreigners ...

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  6. The Obama Administration Blocks Efforts to Stop Non-CitizensRead the original story

    Thursday Apr 30 | PressReleasePoint

    ... Arizona and Kansas sued. A commonsense victory at the district court was overturned by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the fight to restore election integrity has now arrived at the Supreme Court, which is being asked to reverse the decision ...

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  7. The Obama Administration Blocks Efforts to Stop Non-Citizen Voting...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Apr 30 | National Review Online

    ... Arizona and Kansas sued. A commonsense victory at the district court was overturned by the Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals, and the fight to restore election integrity has now arrived at the Supreme Court, which is being asked to reverse the decision ...

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  8. Supreme Court Considers Painful Drugs in Lethal-Injection ProcessRead the original story

    Wednesday Apr 29 | Courthouse News Service

    At oral arguments today on Oklahoma's lethal-injection scheme, the Supreme Court's liberal justices characterized the protocol as burning a man alive by drugs. Oklahoma executed Charles Warner, 47, in January after a deeply divided Supreme Court refused to get involved.

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  9. 10th Cir. Tosses Drug Conviction Due to Insufficient EvidenceRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | FindLaw

    Anthony Washington and Maurice Edwards were both convicted on federal drug possession charges with intent to sell after police found the drugs in the trunk of a rental car Edwards borrowed from his mother. Trouble is, while it was easy for the jury to tie Edwards to the fourteen bricks of marijuana inside a black duffel bag, Washington's connection wasn't so clear.

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  10. Appeals court won't hear Wyoming inmate in boundary disputeRead the original story

    Tuesday Apr 28 | The Navajo Times

    The U.S. 10th Circuit Court of Appeals on Monday denied a request from Andrew Yellowbear, Jr., to file a friend-of-the-court brief. Yellowbear is a member of the Northern Arapaho Tribe who's serving a life sentence in connection with the 2004 murder of his young daughter in Riverton.

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  11. Tenth Circuit Court of Appeals Dismisses Failed Bank Shareholder Derivative Suit under FIRREARead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Apr 28 | JD Supra

    On April 21, the United States Court of Appeals for the Tenth Circuit upheld the dismissal of a bank shareholders' suit against a bank holding company and its officers and directors for breach of fiduciary duty. Barnes v.

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  12. In Replay of FHFA Appeal, Banks Urge Second Circuit To Topple FDIC ClaimsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 27 | Law.com

    The last time a group of big banks asked the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit to rule that a federal agency's mortgage-backed securities claims were barred by the statute of repose, the resulting loss helped trigger a string of settlements worth more than $20 billion to the Federal Housing Finance Agency. The banks fared no better in litigation brought by the National Credit Union Administration, losing a parallel ruling in the Tenth Circuit.

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  13. Making It Easy to CheatRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 27 | Townhall

    On a host of electoral integrity issues, the liberal position can be summarized in two words: enable cheating. You think that's too harsh? How else can you explain the race-baiting rhetoric from President Obama on down against something as commonsense as voter photo ID laws, which the public supports by wide margins? Or the intense drive for Election Day registration, mail-in voting and earlier and earlier balloting, all of which make it harder to detect and prevent vote fraud? Or the opposition to any law ensuring that only citizens can vote? A case in point of the latter is the Obama Administration's stiff-arming of two states that want to require proof of U.S. citizenship in order to register to vote.

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  14. Are Foreign Nationals Stealing American Elections?Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 27 | News Max

    There is little doubt that election integrity measures are essential to clean elections. In support of that goal, Judicial Watch recently joined with the Allied Educational Foundation to file an amici curiae brief with the United States Supreme Court in support of Arizona's and Kansas' efforts to add proof-of-citizenship requirements to a federal voter registration form, Kris W. Kobach, et al., v.

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  15. Once Again, It's The Eve Of History At The Supreme CourtRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 27 | Outside the Beltway

    By this time tomorrow, we should have at least some idea how the arguments regarding the challenges to bans on same-sex marriage in four states - Michigan, Ohio, Kentucky, and Tennessee - went for both sides of the issue, thanks to the fact that both the transcript of the argument and the audio of the proceedings will be released, according to the Clerk's office, as early as possible after the arguments themselves have concluded.

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  16. Utah native takes roundabout route to becoming gaming attorneyRead the original story

    Monday Apr 27 | RGT Online

    Jennifer Roberts never considered a career as a gaming attorney. She grew up in Salt Lake City and earned an undergraduate degree in criminology from the University of Utah.

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  17. SCOTUS to Hear Dispute Over Claim Time LimitsRead the original story

    Monday Apr 27 | Courthouse News Service

    The Supreme Court on Monday announced it will consider a dispute over the time limits for filing certain employment discrimination claims. Marvin Green, a former Colorado postmaster, claimed in a lawsuit filed in September 2010, that the U.S. Postal Service retaliated against him after he complained that he was passed over for a promotion because he is black.

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  18. Saying You Didn't Do Your Job Doesn't Violate Workers' Due ProcessRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 24 | FindLaw

    Everyone makes mistakes. Some folks have one too many drinks before getting behind the wheel.

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  19. Two vie for job as Denver clerk, a job thrust into the limelightRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Apr 26 | Denver Post

    When Debra Johnson was elected Denver clerk and recorder four years ago, Denver was one of only two Colorado counties that didn't post recorded documents online. "Now we have documents online dating to 1977, and my goal over the next four years is to have all the documents online back to 1859, when the city came into being," she said.

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  20. Making it safe to cheatRead the original story

    Sunday Apr 26 | Washington Times

    On a host of electoral integrity issues, the liberal position can be summarized in two words: enable cheating. You think that's too harsh? How else to explain the race-baiting rhetoric from President Obama on down against something as common-sense as voter photo ID laws, which the public supports by wide margins? Or the intense drive for Election Day registration, mail-in voting and earlier and earlier balloting, all of which make it harder to detect and prevent vote fraud? Or the opposition to any law ensuring that only citizens can vote? A case in point of the latter is the Obama administration's stiff-arming of two states that want to require proof of U.S. citizenship in order to register to vote.

    Comment?