John G. Roberts Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for John G. Roberts.

Results 1 - 20 of 542 in John G. Roberts

  1. Mississippi's Race to the BottomRead the original story w/Photo

    12 hrs ago | Slate Magazine

    Driven by its high poverty rate , Mississippi ranks low on health and wellness. It has one the highest rates of obesity, heart disease, and diabetes in the country, as well as the highest mortality rate for infants and adults.

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  2. Supreme Court justices imagined as dogsRead the original story w/Photo

    12 hrs ago | WTVR Richmond

    The HBO television news satire "Last Week Tonight" found a clever way to illustrate the court's public sessions, which are closed to cameras. Audio of the oral arguments- where the justices debate the issues with opposing counsel- is recorded and made available to the public.

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  3. Disagree in Good Faith?Read the original story w/Photo

    13 hrs ago | Slate Magazine

    Supreme Court Justice Sonia Sotomayor speaks during a ribbon-cutting ceremony at George Washington University's Jacob Burns Community Legal Clinics on Jan. 23, 2014. Joan Biskupic's new biography of Sonia Sotomayor, Breaking In , opens with a telling story from the justice's first year on the Supreme Court.

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  4. Here's What 'Racial Discrimination' MeansRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | The Atlantic

    If there's anything Americans agree on, it's that racial discrimination is very bad and should not be permitted. What they don't agree on is what "racial discrimination" means.

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  5. On campaign finance laws, trust the votersRead the original story

    Monday Oct 27 | The Hill

    One of the most shopworn arguments against limiting the influence of money in politics is that incumbent legislators can't be trusted to pass laws that affect their own re-election. Washington Post columnist George Will trotted this argument out in a recent column , claiming that "all limits will be set by incumbent legislators .

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  6. State Courts Choosing to Follow Federal PrecedentsRead the original story

    Monday Oct 27 | PrawfsBlawg

    Following up on his appearance on the Oral Argument podcast , Michael Dorf has a fascinating post up this morning at "Dorf on Law" in which he tackles the intriguing question of whether state courts may choose to "gratuitously" be bound by federal precedents that don't actually bind them under the Supremacy Clause. Michael argues that the answer is no: One might think that, just as a state high court can voluntarily decide whether to construe its constitutional provisions in "lockstep" with the parallel provisions of the federal Constitution or to give greater protection to rights as a matter of state law, so too here, a state can decide to be "more bound" by federal law than is strictly required.

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  7. Vote November 4: Defeat Suppression of Minorities, Youth, WorkersRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Oct 26 | OpEdNews

    Two riveting developments October 8 strike at the heart of Americans' right to vote and minorities' abilities to have fair power. A report by the U.S. Government Accounting Office requested by five senators found that minority turnout was reduced 2-3% in states with ID laws--despite no ID fraud--because of the cost of procuring the ID's.

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  8. This week in the war on voting: Colorado's mail-in voter law changed candidates' campaign approachRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Oct 25 | Daily Kos

    By the NGP's estimate, some 800,000 Georgians-"people of color, voters between the ages of 18 and 29, and unmarried women-what the group calls the 'Rising American Electorate'" weren't registered to vote at the beginning of this year. Since then the group-founded by state Rep. Stacey Abrams, Democratic leader of the Georgia House-says it and 12 partner groups have registered around 116,000 new voters.

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  9. Make My DayTHE Reluctant Evolution of a Computer GeekRead the original story

    Feb 4, 2010 | American Reporter

    It's easy to make the case that there is nothing that has done more to damage the proper functioning of our democracy than the system of legalized bribery and graft that now dominates the American political process. Over the past year in Congress, we've seen the big insurance companies disrupt the health care debate, the big banks opposing regulations to protect our economy, and the big oil companies slow efforts to address global warming.

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  10. Commentary: If Americans allow Republicans to win the senate they will suffer serious consequencesRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Oct 24 | Caribbean News Now!

    By Wellington C. Ramos The United States government is divided into three branches, which are the executive, judicial and legislative. The executive branch is under the control of the Democrats, with their President Barack Obama.

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  11. On Race and Voter ID, John Roberts Wants It Both WaysRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Oct 24 | The Atlantic

    "The way to stop discrimination on the basis of race," Chief Justice John Roberts wrote in 2007, "is to stop discriminating on the basis of race." Those words as much as any may define the chief justice's jurisprudential philosophy today.

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  12. 14 Real "Moral Choices" John 'Pretzel Man'...Read the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Oct 23 | Plunderbund

    Ohio's governor could be his own one-man show at the state fair next year. Based on his convoluted statements on Medicaid and Obamacare recently, first-term Tea Party chief executive John Kasich could bill himself as "Pretzel Man."

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  13. Vote November 4th: Defeat Suppression of Minorities, Youth and WorkersRead the original story w/Photo

    Thursday Oct 23 | OpEdNews

    A report by the U.S. Government Accounting Office requested by five senators found that minority turnout was reduced 2-3% in states with ID laws--despite no ID fraud--because of the cost of procuring the ID's. Close elections were clearly at risk.

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  14. Supreme Court Shirks Responsibility in Avoiding Sixth Amendment CaseRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Oct 22 | Cato Institute

    While conventional wisdom among U.S. Supreme Court watchers is that the narrowness of many of the justices' recent decisions has created a "faux-nanimity," the court's docket control - its ability to pick and choose which cases to hear - goes even further in explaining why the justices are agreeing at record rates. Last week's denial of review in a key sentencing case - Jones v.

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  15. Make My DayTHE Reluctant Evolution of a Computer GeekRead the original story

    Feb 4, 2010 | American Reporter

    It's easy to make the case that there is nothing that has done more to damage the proper functioning of our democracy than the system of legalized bribery and graft that now dominates the American political process. Over the past year in Congress, we've seen the big insurance companies disrupt the health care debate, the big banks opposing regulations to protect our economy, and the big oil companies slow efforts to address global warming.

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  16. The Line Out of This Place Is as Long as the Amazon.com RiverRead the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday Oct 22 | JD Supra

    This month, the U.S. Supreme Court heard argument in a case that would seem to raise easy enough questions: When does an employee's workday begin and end? What activities count as "work"? However, these questions have given way to tortured analysis and fairly arbitrary results. Over the years, courts have ruled pre-shift and post-shift activities are compensable if they are "integral and indispensable" to the principal activity of the employment, whereas activities falling outside this definition are considered "preliminary" and "postliminary" and therefore not compensable.

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  17. Editorial: Struggles of Obamacare playing out in federal courtsRead the original story w/Photo

    Mar 23, 2010 | MassLive.com

    A brief history of earlier efforts: After the 2010 midterm elections, when Republicans picked up an astonishing 63 seats in the House of Representatives, there were many who believed that the newly minted Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act was on the clock. GOP candidates had made the election a referendum on President Barack Obama's signature legislative achievement, and the voters had solidly backed them.

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  18. Supreme Court Hears Arguments on Appellate Standard of Review Over Patent Claim ConstructionRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Oct 21 | JD Supra

    The United States Supreme Court heard oral argument October 15, 2014, in Teva Pharm. USA, Inc. v.

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  19. Supreme Court: Should Appeal Give Deference to Lower Courts on Claim Construction?Read the original story w/Photo

    Monday Oct 20 | jdsupra.com

    On October 15, the Supreme Court heard oral argument in Teva Pharmaceuticals USA Inc., et al. v. Sandoz Inc., et al. , case number 13-854.

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  20. Justices to rule on police searches of hotel registriesRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Oct 19 | USA Today

    The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear the City of Los Angeles' challenge to a federal appeals court decision that struck down a law giving police unrestricted access to hotel and motel registries. Justices to rule on police searches of hotel registries The Supreme Court agreed Monday to hear the City of Los Angeles' challenge to a federal appeals court decision that struck down a law giving police unrestricted access to hotel and motel registries.

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