All in the Family Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for All in the Family.

Results 1 - 20 of 115 in All in the Family

  1. And then there was 'Maude'Read the original story w/Photo

    Sunday | Star Tribune

    "Cousin Maude's Visit," the Dec. 11, 1971, episode of the groundbreaking CBS comedy series "All in the Family," introduced TV audiences to the unforgettable Maude Findlay, the outspoken and feminist cousin of Edith who took no guff from conservative Archie . Producer Norman Lear recalled that the episode was airing on the East Coast when he got a call from the network's programming head, Fred Silverman.

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  2. CheddiRead the original story

    Sunday | Stabroek News

    ... For the folks living next door, you could do as Archie Bunker once said on the US television series 'All in the Family', "Just open the window and holler," but that aside it was a letter or a telegram. In those days, we were in the dark about a host ...

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  3. Norman Lear and His Art: Even This We Got to ExperienceRead the original story

    Thursday Mar 26 | The George Towner

    ... for "Glory" in the film "Selma." Common noted that it was Lear shows like "Good Times," "The Jeffersons," "All in the Family" and "Sanford and Son" that allowed him to see himself and his people portrayed as part of the American cultural tapestry in ...

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  4. 'Maude' returns in 6-season DVD setRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Mar 24 | Toledo Blade

    Cousin Maude's Visit, the Dec. 11, 1971, episode of the groundbreaking CBS comedy series All in the Family, introduced TV audiences to the unforgettable Maude Findlay, the outspoken, liberal, and feminist cousin of Edith who took no guff from conservative Archie even when he called her a "big-mouth buttinski." Producer Norman Lear recalled that the episode was airing on the East Coast when he got a call from the network's programming head, Fred Silverman.

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  5. Bea Arthur's six-season series 'Maude' on DVDRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Mar 23 | The Daily Democrat

    "Cousin Maude's Visit," the Dec. 11, 1971, episode of the groundbreaking CBS comedy series "All in the Family," introduced TV audiences to the unforgettable Maude Findlay, the outspoken, liberal and feminist cousin of Edith who took no guff from conservative Archie even when he called her a "big-mouth buttinski." Producer Norman Lear recalls that the episode was airing on the East Coast when he got a call from the network's programming head, Fred Silverman.

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  6. Topical '70s sitcom - Maude' arrives on DVDRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Mar 22 | Camden Chronicle Independent

    Writer-producer Norman Lear had a string of hugely successful and influential sitcoms during the 1970s and '80s, most notably "All in the Family," "Sanford and Son," "Good Times," "The Jeffersons," "Mary Hartman, Mary Hartman," "Diff'rent Strokes" and "The Facts of Life," among others. And then there's "Maude," as the theme song says.

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  7. Binge Watch: 'Community' transfers to YahooRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Mar 20 | The Wave

    ... many inexplicable ommissions from the DVD market, one of the strangest was "Maude," Norman Lear's first "All in the Family" spinoff. Despite spending four years as a top 10 series in the 1970s, "Maude" had only released one season on disc, that in ...

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  8. Christopher Caldwell: "The Browning of America" And The "Legacy Majority"Read the original story

    Monday Mar 9 | VDARE

    ... racially mixed marriages: three quarters are between black men and white women. a In a 1973 episode of "All in the Family," Archie Bunker spoke of a co-worker everyone called Black Elmo, "so's not to get him mixed up with regular Elmo." ...

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  9. Bea Arthur took 'Maude' out of 'Family's' shadowRead the original story

    Saturday Mar 14 | Los Angeles Times

    "Cousin Maude's Visit," the Dec. 11, 1971, episode of the groundbreaking CBS comedy series "All in the Family," introduced TV audiences to the unforgettable Maude Findlay, the outspoken, liberal and feminist cousin of Edith who took no guff from conservative Archie even when he called her a "big-mouth buttinski." Producer Norman Lear recalled that the episode was airing on the East Coast when he got a call from the network's programming head, Fred Silverman.

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  10. Susan Miles Gulbransen: Chupack, Corrigan, Marlowe and Ryan Lead Way as CALM Celebrity AuthorsRead the original story

    Friday Mar 13 | Noozhawk

    ... fundraiser. This major icon of television history cornered the family sitcom genre with huge hits such as All in the Family , Taxi and 100 more shows. At one time, nine of them topped the list of most popular TV shows. "The more the audience ...

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  11. MomentumFOR REALRead the original story

    Wednesday Mar 11 | American Reporter

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Today would be Carroll O'Connor's birthday. In the person of Archie Bunker, starring in "All in the Family," a sitcom in the 70s, he personified an American bigot.

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  12. 8 powerful life lessons from 92-year-old TV legend Norman LearRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Mar 10 | Silicon Alley Insider

    He's the creator of shows like "All in the Family," "Good Times," and "The Jeffersons," programs that not only brought in 120 million viewers a week, but challenged Americans' views on topics like racism, poverty, and abortion. He worked with comedy icons like Carl Reiner and Mel Brooks and influenced generations of television writers, including "South Park" co-creators Trey Parker and Matt Stone.

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  13. MomentumFOR REALRead the original story

    Monday Mar 9 | American Reporter

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Today would be Carroll O'Connor's birthday. In the person of Archie Bunker, starring in "All in the Family," a sitcom in the 70s, he personified an American bigot.

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  14. That's It, House of Cards. You Lost Me.By Nick GillespieRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Mar 7 | The Daily Beast

    ... thing . What's going on here might be called the "Archie Bunker Effect," and it's no prettier than when All in the Family 's protagonist would belch loudly after chugging a beer while sitting in his favorite living room chair. When All in the Family ...

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  15. What Are You Going To Do When Your Jews Leave?Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Mar 6 | AmmoLand

    Archie Bunker the lovable bigot of the 1970s-1980s TV sit-com 'All in the Family' was a man who professed to only like fellow WASPs that is until he needed a lawyer to sue someone after a minor auto accident. Then he wanted the law firm of Rabinowitz, Rabinowitz and Rabinowitz to represent him because everyone knew that Jewish lawyers are the best at getting what you, the plaintive wants, in a court of law.

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  16. MomentumFOR REALRead the original story

    Wednesday Mar 4 | American Reporter

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Today would be Carroll O'Connor's birthday. In the person of Archie Bunker, starring in "All in the Family," a sitcom in the 70s, he personified an American bigot.

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  17. MomentumFOR REALRead the original story

    Wednesday Mar 4 | American Reporter

    ST. SIMONS ISLAND, Ga. -- Today would be Carroll O'Connor's birthday. In the person of Archie Bunker, starring in "All in the Family," a sitcom in the 70s, he personified an American bigot.

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  18. We will not be stifled, says local advocacy groupRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Mar 3 | Lake Cowichan Gazette

    The Terrace Standard article of Feb. 25. " Just stop it, says district ", brings to mind the phrase "Stifle it, Edith" which was often the response of husband Archie Bunker who starred in the old 1970's TV show "All in the Family". The comment and character are not unlike that presented to the public in meetings both at city council and the regional district.

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  19. Props and script from "Mad Men" will be on display at SmithsonianRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Mar 1 | Star Tribune

    The gray suit and fedora worn by Jon Hamm as the enigmatic lead in the landmark series "Mad Men" will join the permanent collection at the Washington, D.C., museum in a ceremony on March 27. The Smithsonian, famously the home to Archie Bunker's armchair from "All in the Family," also will receive other key memorabilia from the show, including Don's well-worn bar cart and the original script for the Season 1 finale, "The Wheel," complete with an ending that was never filmed.

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  20. Washington, D.C.: As seen on TVRead the original story w/Photo

    Sunday Mar 1 | The Miami Herald

    Don Draper is headed for the Smithsonian. The gray suit and fedora worn by Jon Hamm as the enigmatic lead in the landmark series Mad Men will join the permanent collection at the Smithsonian's Museum of American History in a ceremony on March 27. The ceremony is one of a number of exhibitions, panel conversations and screenings planned at major cultural institutions in New York, Los Angeles and Washington in the run-up to the show's final seven episodes, which begin airing April 5. The Smithsonian, famously the home to Archie Bunker's armchair from All in the Family , will also receive other key memorabilia from the show, including Don's no doubt well-worn bar cart, and the original script for the memorable Season 1 finale, "The Wheel," complete with an ending that was never filmed.

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