Vitamin D Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Vitamin D.

Results 1 - 20 of 1,063 in Vitamin D

  1. More than one-third of Division I college athletes may have low vitamin D levelsRead the original story w/Photo

    2 hrs ago | Science Daily

    A new study found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize musculoskeletal pain and injury risk. A new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize musculoskeletal pain and injury risk.

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  2. More than one-third of Division I college athletes may have low vitamin D levelsRead the original story w/Photo

    2 hrs ago | PhysOrg Weblog

    A new study presented today at the 2015 Annual Meeting of the American Academy of Orthopaedic Surgeons found that more than one-third of elite, Division I college athletes may have low levels of vitamin D, which is critical in helping the body to absorb calcium needed to maintain bone mass, and to minimize musculoskeletal pain and injury risk. Up to 1 billion people globally have insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels.

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  3. Phase 3 Data Supporting Rayaldeea As a Treatment for Secondary...Read the original story

    3 hrs ago | Freshnews

    OPKO Health, Inc. , today announced the presentation of additional phase 3 clinical data in a poster at the National Kidney Foundation's Spring Clinical Meetings on March 27-28th, 2015 in Dallas, Texas, that will include data for 429 patients completing up to twelve months of treatment in OPKO's phase 3 trials for Rayaldee as a treatment for secondary hyperparathyroidism in patients with stage 3 or 4 chronic kidney disease and vitamin D insufficiency. The data to be presented will highlight the unexpected finding that responses to Rayaldee treatment are as good in patients with stage 4 CKD as they are in stage 3 CKD.

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  4. It's Madness! More than one-third of Division I college athletes may have low vitamin D levelsRead the original story w/Photo

    9 hrs ago | Sys-Con Media

    Up to 1 billion people globally have insufficient or deficient vitamin D levels. Vitamin D is found in fish, regularly added to milk and dairy products in the U.S., and available as a supplement.

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  5. Experts split over proper amounts of Vitamin DRead the original story w/Photo

    18 hrs ago | New York Daily News

    Exposing bare skin to sunlight is the best way to get the vitamin D you need, experts say. Just make sure not to overdo it so you burn and increase your risk of skin cancer.

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  6. Vitamin D and the risk of dementia and Alzheimer diseaseRead the original story

    22 hrs ago | CiteULike

    Objective: To determine whether low vitamin D concentrations are associated with an increased risk of incident all-cause dementia and Alzheimer disease. Methods: One thousand six hundred fifty-eight elderly ambulatory adults free from dementia, cardiovascular disease, and stroke who participated in the US population-based Cardiovascular Health Study between 1992-1993 and 1999 were included.

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  7. Vitamin D deficiency can make you very sick, know all about the compoundRead the original story w/Photo

    Yesterday | The Indian Express

    The deficiency of Vitamin D can lead to serious health complications . If you mostly stay indoors, get your Vitamin D levels checked, for you might be prone to Diabetes, osteoporosis, Alzheimer's, heart disease and even cancer.

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  8. Equivocal study on Finnish women doesn't dim Vitamin D's role in...Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | NutraIngredients-USA

    A new vitamin D/exercise study on falls among older women has confirmed the vitamin's role in bone health but falls short of a ringing endorsement for supplementation. But it's one data point among the many that still point to the importance of getting additional vitamin D, said Duffy McKay, ND of the Council for Responsible Nutrition.

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  9. Vitamin D May Keep Low-grade Prostate Cancer From Becoming AggressiveRead the original story

    Wednesday | Scientific Blogging

    Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, a scientist will report today. His team will describe the approach in one of nearly 11,000 presentations at the 249th National Meeting & Exposition of the American Chemical Society , the world's largest scientific society.

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  10. Why Does Prostate Cancer Affect Black Men Differently?Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Weekend

    ... data support the linkage between diet and cancer risk. A nutritional factor related to prostate cancer risk is vitamin D deficiency. Vitamin D deficiency is more common in African Americans compared to Caucasians and is believed to be due to ...

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  11. Why 'eating for two' when you're pregnant could leave you at risk...Read the original story w/Photo

    Wednesday | Daily Mail

    ... to give your baby the best start in life.' It's all about bones! You and your baby need calcium rich foods and Vitamin D to help you absorb them. Your baby is developing teeth and bones and you need to ensure your calcium stores are stocked for both ...

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  12. Exercise and Vitamin D in Fall Prevention Among Older Women: A Randomized Clinical Trial.Read the original story

    Wednesday | CiteULike

    While vitamin D supplementation and exercise are recommended for prevention of falls for older people, results regarding these 2 factors are contradictory. To determine the effectiveness of targeted exercise training and vitamin D supplementation in reducing falls and injurious falls among older women.

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  13. Is being cooped up in school cause of Myopia 'epidemic'?Read the original story

    Wednesday | Newkerala.com

    Myopia, or short-sightedness, has assumed 'epidemic' proportions in the last 30 years, with some countries reporting prevalence of 80-90 percent - and the reason could simply be lack of adequate light in classrooms. Richard Hobday, an authority on sunlight and health, has in a new study compared myopia to bone disease rickets, caused by the lack of Vitamin D that you get from sunlight.

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  14. Are our schools damaging children's eyes?Read the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Mar 24 | PhysOrg Weblog

    ... affected. The remedy proved elusive until the 1920s, when scientists found that a lack of sunlight, resulting in vitamin D deficiency, was the cause of rickets. Myopia, like rickets, is a seasonal condition which seems to get worse in the winter. ...

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  15. Vitamin D vital for gene expression in developing brainsRead the original story w/Photo

    Tuesday Mar 24 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The study investigated the gene expression of four neurotrophic genes responsible for the production of proteins which relate to the survival, development and function of neurons . Credit: Bethany Brown Vitamin D deficiency in mothers leading up to and during pregnancy has fundamental consequences for their offspring's brain development, researchers from University of Western Australia and the Telethon Kids Institute have confirmed.

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  16. Exercise, but Not Vitamin D, Cuts Injuries from Falls in Older WomenRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Mar 23 | MedlinePlus

    Neither routine exercise nor vitamin D supplementation does anything to lower the overall risk for accidental falls among older women, a new Finnish study says. However, the risk of serious injury as a result of falling was cut by more than half when elderly women engaged in regular exercise, according to the study.

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  17. Vitamin D for Low-Grade Prostate CancerRead the original story

    Sunday Mar 22 | Ivanhoe

    Taking vitamin D supplements could slow or even reverse the progression of less aggressive, or low-grade, prostate tumors without the need for surgery or radiation, scientists

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  18. Vitamin D may reduce progression of low-grade prostate cancerRead the original story

    Monday Mar 23 | Newkerala.com

    According to a recent research, Vitamin D consumption may lead to lowering or even reverse the progression of low-grade prostate cancer, without the need of surgery or radiation. The tumor's aggressiveness after a prostate biopsy was measured on Gleason Grading System, and tumors with Gleason scores of 7 and above were considered aggressive and likely to spread whereas those with a score of 6 and below considered less aggressive.

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  19. Healthwatch: This Week's Medical NewsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Mar 23 | 5NEWSonline.com

    ... and better quality of life up to fifteen years later. Researchers at the Medical University of South Carolina say Vitamin D supplements may slow or even reverse the progression of low-grade prostate tumors. They say more than half of men taking 4000 ...

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  20. Vitamin D supplements might slow prostate cancerRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Mar 23 | KNDO

    "Vitamin D decreases inflammation in tissues, and inflammation is a driver of cancer," explained Bruce Hollis, the study's lead researcher and a professor of pediatrics, biochemistry and molecular biology at the Medical University of South Carolina in Charleston. For the study, researchers randomly assigned 37 men who elected to have their prostate removed to receive either 4,000 international units of vitamin D or an inactive placebo daily for 60 days before their operation.

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