Cryptography Newswire

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Cryptography.

Results 1 - 20 of 3,938 in Cryptography

  1. Secure Ads Layer: The Ad Fraud Solution You've Never Heard OfRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | AdExchanger.com

    ... although the average user probably doesn't know that it works because of a technique called public key cryptography. A browser can use a public key to confirm that a certificate was signed with the corresponding private key, without having access to ...

    Comment?

  2. Daily Roundup: Nintendo and indie gaming, HTC's attempt at VR and moreRead the original story w/Photo

    5 hrs ago | Engadget

    In today's Daily Roundup, we take a look at Nintendo's relationship with indie game makers, find out how Valve wants to change VR and chat with HTC's chief designer. Head past the break to get caught up on all of the day's top stories.

    Comment?

  3. Colburn: Security alert for smartphone and Mac usersRead the original story w/Photo

    6 hrs ago | The Arizona Republic

    If you have a Mac computer, iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch and you still use the Safari browser, or you're using the default browser on many Android devices, you could be vulnerable to a newly discovered security flaw. Ken Colburn: Security alert for smartphone and Mac users If you have a Mac computer, iPhone, iPad or iPod Touch and you still use the Safari browser, or you're using the default browser on many Android devices, you could be vulnerable to a newly discovered security flaw.

    Comment?

  4. Apple, Google device users vulnerable to hacking over 'zombie' security bugRead the original story w/Photo

    7 hrs ago | South China Morning Post

    ... allowed under US restrictions designed to limit trade in military technologies in the 1990s. But 512-bit cryptography has been considered unacceptably weak for more than a decade. Even experts thought it had disappeared. "We thought, of course, ...

    Comment?

  5. FAA leaves air traffic system open to security risk, says GAORead the original story

    8 hrs ago | Government Computer News

    ... unauthorized access, which it can address with boundary protection, identification and authentication of users, cryptography and auditing and monitoring procedures. The report also said FAA did not consistently implement identification controls in ...

    Comment?

  6. Millions of online shoppers' confidential information is visible to hackers due to weak securityRead the original story w/Photo

    10 hrs ago | I4U Future Technology News

    ... respectively. In order to understand the basics of the whole situation, you need take a look at the past of cryptography. FREAK stands for Factoring attacks on RSA Export Keys. In order to secure websites, a debate was held back in 1990s, in which ...

    Comment?

  7. Old Security Flaw Leaves Apple And Android Users VulnerableRead the original story

    12 hrs ago | [H]ard OCP

    A team of cryptographers have discovered that a security flaw from way back in the '90s still leaves users today vulnerable to cyberattacks.

    Comment?

  8. Old US Encryption Export Limits Return To Haunt WebRead the original story

    13 hrs ago | Data Storage Today

    ... that say they need to have built-in, "backdoor" access to networking and communications systems. "Backdoors in cryptography are generally a bad idea, because a door you leave open for yourself may also one day be used by others," Bhargavan said. "To ...

    Comment?

  9. FREAK Attacks SSL/TLS Security, Putting Apple, Android Users at RiskRead the original story w/Photo

    14 hrs ago | CNet News

    ... as CVE-2015-0204, is a cryptographic weakness that is triggered by use of what is known as export-grade cryptography. It was reported by the miTLS research effort, which is a joint project of INRIA and Microsoft Research. "This attack targets a ...

    Comment?

  10. Old US Crypto Limits Return To HauntRead the original story w/Photo

    13 hrs ago | NewsFactor

    ... that say they need to have built-in, "backdoor" access to networking and communications systems. "Backdoors in cryptography are generally a bad idea, because a door you leave open for yourself may also one day be used by others," Bhargavan said. "To ...

    Comment?

  11. Bug leaves millions of Apple, Google users vulnerableRead the original story w/Photo

    13 hrs ago | New Vision

    APPLE Inc and Google Inc said on Tuesday that they have developed fixes to mitigate the newly uncovered 'Freak' security flaw affecting mobile devices and Mac computers. The vulnerability in web encryption technology could enable attackers to spy on communications of users of Apple's Safari browser and Google Inc's Android browser, according to researchers who uncovered the flaw.

    Comment?

  12. New 'FREAK Attack' Exploits SSL/TLS Vulnerability Between Many Servers and ClientsRead the original story w/Photo

    14 hrs ago | The WHIR

    A newly disclosed SSL/TLS vulnerability known as the FREAK attack allows attackers to intercept HTTPS connections between clients and servers, and forces them to downgrade security to weak "export-grade" cryptography allowing the message to be decrypted and even altered. This vulnerability affects connections between servers that accept RSA_EXPORT cipher suites and web browsers that offer an RSA_EXPORT suite or use an OpenSSL version that's vulnerable to RSA-to-EXPORT RSA downgrade attacks .

    Comment?

  13. FREAK vulnerability exploits old encryption export restrictionsRead the original story

    15 hrs ago | The Tech Report

    To understand the latest security problem facing the web today, we have to use the DeLorean and return to the 1990s. It was a different time.

    Comment?

  14. This New Web Security Bug Might FREAK You OutRead the original story w/Photo

    15 hrs ago | PC Magazine

    Researchers this week disclosed a security flaw that has left some Apple and Google device users vulnerable to attack when visiting supposedly secure websites. The vulnerability, known as FREAK , dates back more than a decade, and opens those on the Android and Safari browsers to man-in-the-middle hacks when surfing various sites, including government pages.

    Comment?

  15. a Hip way of securing a wide range of endpointsRead the original story w/Photo

    16 hrs ago | Computer Weekly

    While this is a major concern for all companies and individuals, in the world of industry and cyber security, the stakes are almost limitless. Imagine the impact of a successful cyber attack on a nuclear power station, a hydro-electric dam, a gas or oil plant, or even a major retailer.

    Comment?

  16. Millions of Apple and Google customers are vulnerable to a decades-old 'FREAK' hackRead the original story w/Photo

    17 hrs ago | Albany Times Union

    ... for Factoring attacks on RSA-EXPORT Keys. To understand what that it is, you need to know about the history of cryptography. Back in the 1990s, there was a debate over the use of cryptography to secure websites. Researchers and developers argued it ...

    Comment?

  17. Image courtesy of Shutterstock.comRead the original story

    Nov 3, 2013 | IT Business

    ... There are others like Ripple, Litecoin, Peercoin etc. Basically these are virtual currencies protected through cryptography. They have no physical existence but you can use them to purchase real goods. They are decentralized, with a public ledger to ...

    Comment?

  18. Security flaw from the '90s leaves Apple and Android users open to attackRead the original story w/Photo

    19 hrs ago | Engadget

    A team of cryptographers have discovered that a security flaw from way back in the '90s still leaves users today vulnerable to cyberattacks. They've dubbed it "Factoring attack on RSA-EXPORT Key" or FREAK, and it renders everyone who uses Safari on Mac and iOS devices or Android's stock browser susceptible to hacking when they visit certain "secure" websites.

    Comment?

  19. Encryption flaw opened Android and Apple smartphones to online drive-by attacksRead the original story w/Photo

    19 hrs ago | Computing.co.uk

    Ninety-five per cent of the world's smartphones in use today have been wide open to a decade-old flaw that would have enabled attackers to steal passwords and other sensitive data. The security flaw, dubbed "Freak", would have exposed visitors to US government websites - and possibly many more - to drive-by attacks.

    Comment?

  20. Freak out: Apple and Android gear vulnerable to yet another open-source bugRead the original story w/Photo

    20 hrs ago | ComputerWorld

    ... it can always surprise you. The export-grade RSA ciphers are the remains of a 1980s-vintage effort to weaken cryptography. ... This might be an academic point if it was only a history lesson. However...politicians have been publicly mooting the ...

    Comment?