Archaeology Newswire

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Results 1 - 20 of 10,547 in Archaeology

  1. U.S. Department of State Virtual Exchange ProgramRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Scoop

    The U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and PBS LearningMedia will host a series of blended online and in-person conversations about ancient civilizations with high school students, the first of which will take place on Wednesday, October 22. This blended discussion will include high school students from the School Without Walls in Washington, D.C., and Sagesse High School in Beirut, Lebanon for a dialogue about the rich identity and history of ancient Mesopotamia and State Department-sponsored preservation projects in the region. This program builds on the United States' commitment to protecting and preserving the cultural heritage of the Middle East and our shared legacy in its history.

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  2. Head of sphinx discovered at mysterious Greek tombRead the original story w/Photo

    2 hrs ago | The Star Online

    The head of a near-intact marble sphinx has been discovered in the largest tomb ever unearthed in Amphipolis, northern Greece, the culture ministry announced on Tuesday. Discovered in the fourth chamber of a burial mound at the site in the northern region of Macedonia, the sphinx is more than half-a-metre high and was marked by "traces of red", according to a statement from the ministry.

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  3. Photographer's Notebook Found in Melting Antarctic IceRead the original story

    2 hrs ago | Archaeology

    ... graphs held by the Scott Polar Research Institute in Cambridge. For more on photographs from the expedition, see ARCHAEOLOGY's " Photographs from Shackleton's Expedition Developed ."

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  4. 6,000-year-old temple discovered in prehistoric Ukraine settlementRead the original story w/Photo

    3 hrs ago | UPI

    ... Archaeologists' annual meeting in Turkey. Nataliya Burdo and Mykhailo Videiko, researchers with the Institute of Archaeology of the National Academy of Sciences of Ukraine, say they believe the ancient temple hosted regular ritual animal sacrifices. ...

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  5. U.S Consul General in Karachi along with others visits MoenjodaroRead the original story

    7 hrs ago | Hispanic Business

    US Consul General in Karachi Brain Heath along with other officials of the Consulate General and USAID visited the world famous five thousand: yearsold ruins of Indus Valley Civilization, at Moenjodaro, on Monday. The US Consul General along with other officials of the Consulate General and USAID visited the Museum in which the antiques found from the ruins are preserved and put on display and took interest in the articles preserved in the museum.

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  6. Ancient Europeans intolerant to lactose for 5,000 years after they adopted agricultureRead the original story w/Photo

    10 hrs ago | Science Daily

    ... humans and any other mammals. According to Professor Ron Pinhasi from the UCD Earth Institute and UCD School of Archaeology, University College Dublin, the joint senior author on the paper, "the high percentage DNA yield from the petrous bones ...

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  7. Cal athletic director search committee named; list expected by spring 2015Read the original story w/Photo

    4 hrs ago | California Golden Blogs

    ... and computer systems). Professor Conkey was one of the first archaeologists to introduce feminist theory into archaeology, and is thus a pioneering figure in the subfields of gender archaeology and feminist archaeology . Her other recent field ...

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  8. Archaeologists find missing head of Amphipolis sphinxRead the original story w/Photo

    4 hrs ago | EKathimerini

    Archaeologists digging at a tomb dating to the era of Alexander the Great in ancient Amphipolis in northern Greece have found the missing head of one of the two sphinxes guarding the entrance of the grave. According to a statement yesterday by the Culture Ministry, the head, which was found inside the tombA's third chamber, belongs to the statue on the eastern side of the entrance.

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  9. Feverish talks on payment plan proposalsRead the original story w/Photo

    4 hrs ago | EKathimerini

    While old debts to the state have grown to 70.1 billion euros, after adding another billion in September, an eagerly anticipated regulation for the provision of new payment programs is being delayed due to reactions from the countryA's creditors and the responsible ministersA' inability to agree on a proposal.

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  10. Certainty on primary surplus targetRead the original story w/Photo

    4 hrs ago | EKathimerini

    The state budgetA's primary surplus beat expectations by almost a billion euros in the first nine months of the year, General Accounting Office data confirmed on Tuesday, but tax revenues and social security funding figures are causing concern at the Finance Ministry. By the end of last month the primary surplus had reached 2.53 billion euros, against a target for 1.55 billion.

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  11. Credit sector officials sleeping easy ahead of stress test resultsRead the original story w/Photo

    4 hrs ago | EKathimerini

    Analysts, investment banks and institutional investors appear optimistic regarding the results of the European Central Bank stress tests on local lenders, which has been mirrored in the performance of bank stocks so far this week. The message is that they expect the capital requirements to be announced this Sunday to be small and manageable.

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  12. The Miami Circle had roots in Cuba or South AmericaRead the original story w/Photo

    5 hrs ago | Examiner.com

    ... Their primary concern was the region's many Civil War battlefields. The Shenandoah Valley was a Black Hole of archaeology . Eventually, I was able to find books by the earliest settlers of the region in the 1700s, who described the region as ...

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  13. King Tut Had A Club Foot And Other Deformities, New 'Autopsy' ShowsRead the original story w/Photo

    6 hrs ago | Switched

    The scientists say that a 'virtual autopsy' of Tut -- essentially a close analysis of a life-size image of the king made from more than 2,000 CT scans of his mummified remains -- shows that he had buck teeth and a club foot as well as a girlish figure. The findings, featured in a new BBC One documentary entitled "Tutankhamun: The Truth Uncovered," suggest a new explanation for King Tut's mysterious death.

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  14. Greek archaeologists unearth head of sphinx in Macedonian tombRead the original story

    6 hrs ago | Reuters

    Archaeologists unearthed the missing head of one of the two sphinxes found guarding the entrance of an ancient tomb in Greece's northeast, as the diggers made their way into the monument's inner chambers, the culture ministry said on Tuesday. The tomb on the Amphipolis site, about 100 km from Greece's second-biggest city Thessaloniki, has been hailed by archaeologists as a major discovery from the era of Alexander the Great.

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  15. It's a big drag, but habitat project is far from boringRead the original story

    6 hrs ago | Sun Advocate

    ... hunters in the old days," Rusty commented. There's no sign of any other human artifacts. "We've gotten an arc (archaeology) clearance," Nielson explained. "They set up a grid and walked it and didn't find anything." The archaeological team was one ...

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  16. Ancient 'Persephone' Mosaic May Hold Key to Tomb MysteryRead the original story w/Photo

    7 hrs ago | Mashable

    The imposing mosaic unearthed in the burial mound complex at Amphipolis in northern Greece might contain the best-ever portrait of Alexander the Great as a young man, according to a new interpretation of the stunning artwork, which depicts the abduction of Persephone. The mosaic portrays the soul-escorting Hermes, Hades and Persephone.

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  17. Paradox: Christian Creationism Bad - Native American Creationism GoodRead the original story w/Photo

    7 hrs ago | Quebec Chronicle-Telegraph

    ... and justice. Now a decade later, Johnson inquires of Steve Lekson, a professor of anthropology and curator of archaeology at the University of Colorado Museum of Natural History what he thinks of the requirement to turn over skeletal remains and ...

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  18. Stone in Jerusalem may answer ancient mysteryRead the original story w/Photo

    7 hrs ago | Yahoo!

    A details from a large stone bearing an official Latin inscription some 2,000 years old, which archeologists from the Israeli Antiquities Authority describe as 'extremely rare' and of 'tremendous historical significance' is displayed before the Rockefeller Museum in East Jerusalem, October 21, 2014. The inscription is a dedication to the Roman emperor Hadrian and consists of six lines engraved on hard limestone which reads, 'To the Imperator Caesar Traianus Hadranus Augustus, son of the deified Parthicus, grandson of the deified Nerva, high priest, invested with tribunician power for the 14th time, consul for the third time, father of the country the 10th legion Fretensis Antoniniana.'

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  19. Rare Inscription Hailing Emperor Hadrian Unearthed in JerusalemRead the original story w/Photo

    7 hrs ago | Live Science

    A newly uncovered large slab of limestone with an official commemoration to the Roman Emperor Hadrian may help researchers understand the events that led to the Bar Kokhba revolt in the early second century, experts said. The finding is both rare and tremendous, and may be one of the most important Latin inscriptions ever uncovered in Jerusalem, the researchers said.

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  20. Collected Department Releases: U.S. Department of State Builds Bridge ...Read the original story w/Photo

    8 hrs ago | State Department

    The U.S. Department of State's Bureau of Educational and Cultural Affairs and PBS LearningMedia will host a series of blended online and in-person conversations about ancient civilizations with high school students, the first of which will take place on Wednesday, October 22. This blended discussion will include high school students from the School Without Walls in Washington, D.C., and Sagesse High School in Beirut, Lebanon for a dialogue about the rich identity and history of ancient Mesopotamia and State Department-sponsored preservation projects in the region. This program builds on the United States' commitment to protecting and preserving the cultural heritage of the Middle East and our shared legacy in its history.

    Comment?