Medicine Newswire (Page 12)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for Medicine. (Page 12)

Results 221 - 240 of 803,342 in Medicine

  1. What is Scoliosis?Read the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Examiner.com

    You may have heard the term Scoliosis used before, and you may even remember being screened for Scoliosis when you were in grade school. But what exactly is Scoliosis? Normally, your spine will be straight when viewed from the front or back.

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  2. Georgia temporarily halts executions to examine drugRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | KOLD-TV Tucson

    By KATE BRUMBACK Associated Press JACKSON, Ga. - Corrections officials in Georgia have temporarily halted all planned executions to give the state time to analyze a drug that prompted the last-minute postponement of an execution.

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  3. Oregon board endorses eliminating non-medical vaccine exemptionsRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | The Oregonian

    The Oregon Health Policy Board weighted into the vaccine debate on Tuesday, coming out in favor of eliminating non-medical exemptions. In a unanimous vote, board members endorsed a policy statement, saying "the board supports strengthening the state's school vaccination law so that exemptions are only allowed for medical purposes."

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  4. Adults only really catch flu about twice a decade, suggests studyRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Science Daily

    ... who worked on the study at Imperial College London before moving to the London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, said: "There's a lot of debate in the field as to how often people get flu, as opposed to flu-like illness caused by something ...

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  5. Crashes are the Leading Cause of On-the-job Death for Truck Drivers in the USRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Health News Digest

    Our nation depends on truck drivers to deliver goods and services safely and efficiently. Yet, crashes involving large trucks continue to take a toll on truck drivers, their passengers, other road users, businesses, and the community.

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  6. 53-year-old widow and breast cancer survivor takes on new challenge a " preparing for figure contestRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Post and Courier

    What is now known as “The Great Recession” was a hard time for many Americans, but it's probably safe to say Linda Chandler McDandel probably had a tougher time than most for both financial and personal reasons. In 2007, her husband's condominium development in Myrtle Beach went bust, hurling the couple into a financial free fall, and likely contributing to his first heart attack.

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  7. Implant Knee Cartilage Grown From Patient's Own CellsRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Health News Digest

    COLUMBUS, Ohio - Doctors at The Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center are the first in Ohio to use a tissue implant made from a patient's own cells to treat knee cartilage damage. Healthy cartilage is crucial to the smooth and painless mobility of most joints, and has limited capacity to repair itself after injury.

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  8. Parents of 'Free-Range' Kids Guilty of Neglect: CPSRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | WSNX-FM Grand Rapids

    Danielle and Alexander Meitiv, a climate-science expert and a physicist for the National Institutes of Health now best known as the "free-range" parents who let their two kids walk unsupervised from parks to their house, have been formally declared "responsible for unsubstantiated child neglect" by local child protective services. The ruling was one of three possible outcomes in neglect investigations, reports the Washington Post : ruled out, unsubstantiated, or indicated.

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  9. Lawyers: Georgia officials indecisive about executionRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Boston Herald

    Before they ultimately postponed an execution at the eleventh hour, Georgia officials were indecisive about whether they should proceed with a cloudy injection drug, according to a court filing. Kelly Renee Gissendaner was set to die at 7 p.m. Monday.

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  10. FDA warning: men's testosterone drugs overusedRead the original story

    1 hr ago | Boston Herald

    The Food and Drug Administration is warning doctors against the overuse of testosterone-boosting drugs for men, saying the popular treatments have not been established as safe or effective for treating common signs of aging like low libido and fatigue. The agency says drugmakers must clarify that their drugs, currently taken by millions of U.S. men, are only approved to treat low testosterone levels caused by disease or injury, not normal aging.

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  11. Helping Student-Athletes With Mental Health IssuesRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Mental Help Net

    ... and supported by other groups, including the American Academy of Pediatrics, American Medical Society for Sports Medicine and American Psychological Association. More than 7.7 million American high school students play organized school sports each ...

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  12. POPULAR: The evergreen Irish folk band Whiskey in the Jar return to play Chorley's Little TheatreRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Chorley Citizen

    The evergreen Irish folk band Whiskey in the Jar return to play Chorley's Little Theatre once more following their sell out performance last summer, and once again two local hospices are set to benefit from the night. Last year the band celebrated 25 years on the road, and eleven of the band's present and former members graced the stage at the little Theatre in a night of Irish music, humour and nostalgia.

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  13. Nearly a third of Toronto students overweight or obeseRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | GlobalNews

    A new report from Toronto Public Health sheds light on the health of Grade 7 to 12 students in Toronto. What does it show? Most don't smoke or use drugs, but one third of students are overweight and just a small minority of students meet Canada's physical guidelines for youth.

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  14. Surrogate mothers in India often unaware of risksRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | The Globe and Mail

    Renting out their wombs may ease financial problems for poor women in India, but new research suggests surrogate mothers there are unaware of the risks and often left out of key medical decisions about their pregnancy. "Of the 14 surrogate mothers I interviewed, not a single one could explain the risks from having multiple embryos placed in their uterus, or having a fetal reduction or a cesarean section," said Dr. Malene Tanderup from Aarhus University in Denmark.

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  15. Study: Focus Heart Care on the YoungRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Wall Street Journal

    ... a relatively young age, said Neil Stone, a professor of cardiology at Northwestern University's Feinberg School of Medicine and lead author of the guidelines. "Would you really want to give them a statin when lifestyle could take care of the ...

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  16. Health officials trying to gauge vaccination opposition and figure out what to do about itRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Vancouver Sun

    Sports columnist Cam Cole's analysis of the highs and lows of NHL Trade Deadline Day. He also takes a look at how a daughter's plea to Minnesota Wild steals the show.

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  17. Ebola Nurse Pham Sues HospitalRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Breitbart.com

    Nina Pham, the first of two nurses at Texas Health Presbyterian Hospital Dallas who contracted the Ebola virus from Thomas Eric Duncan, has filed a lawsuit against the hospital's parent company, Texas Health Resources . Her lawsuit reveals for the first time troubling allegations about a long list of safety failures and undue risks committed by a hospital desperate to protect its image.

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  18. Honoring a Pioneer in Fetal SurgeryRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Surgical Products

    Two pioneers in American surgery, one from the 19th century and one contemporary figure, were the focus of a March 2 event at which the Philadelphia Academy of Surgery presented the Samuel D. Gross Prize for original research in surgery to N. Scott Adzick, M.D., Surgeon-in-Chief at The Children's Hospital of Philadelphia and The C. Everett Koop Professor of Pediatric Surgery at CHOP and in the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania. Dr. Adzick is being honored for his pioneering work in fetal surgery, a field of medicine that treats birth defects in the womb.

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  19. Prevnar, Pfizer's pneumonia vaccine, okayed for adults in EURead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | Seattle Post-Intelligencer

    Pfizer's blockbuster vaccine against pneumonia and other bacterial infections has won another approval, for use in European Union residents aged 18 and older. It protects against 13 strains of pneumococcal disease, the most common bacterial cause of pneumonia and a top cause of death and hospitalization worldwide.

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  20. Montgomery Council OKs Bill Banning Public E-Cigarette UseRead the original story w/Photo

    1 hr ago | CBS Local

    WJZ-TV is part of CBS Television Stations, a division [] 105.7 The Fan CLICK HERE FOR THE 105.7 THE FAN HOMEPAGE Welcome to 105.7 The FAN on CBSBaltimore.com. 105.7 along with WJZ-TV and CBS Sports Radio 1300 give you the best Baltimore has to offer.

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