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  1. Collection of recent editorials in OklahomaRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 24, 2014 | Insurance News Net

    It's now time to begin addressing the decades of neglected maintenance and repairs that come with any century-old building. Visitors, state employees and elected officials have had to endure the inconveniences of leaky pipes, faulty wiring and barricades around entrances.

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  2. States' use of execution drugs varies widelyRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 23, 2014 | Worcester Telegram & Gazette

    File - This Oct. 9, 2014 file photo, shows an arm restraint on the gurney in the the execution chamber at the Oklahoma State Penitentiary in McAlester, Okla. Problematic executions in Oklahoma, Arizona and other states have highlighted a patchwork approach that states now take with lethal drugs, with types, combinations and dosages varying widely.

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  3. Morphofunctional responses to anaemia in rat skeletal muscle.Read the original story

    Dec 23, 2014 | CiteULike

    Adult male Sprague-Dawley rats were randomly assigned to two groups: control and anaemic. Anaemia was induced by periodical blood withdrawal.

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  4. Arizona to change drugs it uses in executionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 23, 2014 | WTNH

    Arizona officials said Monday they have been cleared of any wrongdoing in an execution this year that lasted nearly two hours, but they are nevertheless changing the drugs they use to put inmates to death. According to a letter from Department of Corrections Director Charles Ryan to Gov. Jan Brewer, the agency no longer will use the drug combination used in the controversial July execution of Joseph Rudolph Wood.

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  5. Arizona changing execution drugs after July incidentRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 23, 2014 | The Kingman Daily Miner

    Arizona officials said Monday they are changing the drugs they use in executions after an inmate in July gasped repeatedly over the course of nearly two hours while being put to death. According to a letter from Department of Corrections Director Charles Ryan to Gov. Jan Brewer, the department no longer will use the combination of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a pain killer.

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  6. Arizona to change drugs used for executionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | USA Today

    Five months after Arizona death-row inmate Joseph Wood gasped and snored for nearly two hours on an execution gurney before dying, a review of the incident released Monday found no explanation of what went wrong. Arizona to change drugs used for executions PHOENIX - Five months after Arizona death-row inmate Joseph Wood gasped and snored for nearly two hours on an execution gurney before dying, a review of the incident released Monday found no explanation of what went wrong.

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  7. .com | Arizona will change drugs used in executionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 23, 2014 | News24

    Arizona officials have said they are changing the drugs they use in executions after an inmate in July gasped repeatedly over the course of nearly two hours while being put to death. Arizona no longer will use the combination of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a pain killer, according to a letter to Governor Jan Brewer from department of corrections director Charles Ryan.

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  8. Oklahoma's lethal injection protocol is approved by a judgeRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | Examiner.com

    An Oklahoma judge has approved the state of Oklahoma's lethal injection protocol, including the controversial drug midalozam, which is thought to be painful for prisoners, according to ABC News on Monday. The decision, which was rendered from the U.S. District Court by Judge Stephen Friot, was rendered in response to an appeal from four death row inmates to stop their executions on the basis that the lethal injections would be "cruel and unusual punishment."

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  9. Arizona to ditch drug cocktail used in 2-hour executionRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | UPI

    Arizona will no longer be using a two-drug cocktail it used in the execution of Joseph Wood, who died after two hours and 15 doses of the drug. A review of state's lethal injection protocol found Wood's execution was "handled appropriately," yet determined a two-drug combination of midazolam and hydromorphone would no longer be used.

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  10. Arizona to change execution drugs after inmate took two hours to dieRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | Los Angeles Times

    Arizona plans to stop employing the drug combination it used to execute an inmate who took nearly two hours to die, the head of the state Department of Corrections said Monday. In July, inmate Joseph Rudolph Wood III was injected with 15 separate doses of the drug combination - hydromorphone and midazolam - because the initial dose didn't seem to be enough to kill him, according to documents the Corrections Department released to Wood's attorney.

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  11. Records: Texas has enough drugs for 5 executionsRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | Click2Houston

    Texas Department of Criminal Justice records obtained Monday by The Associated Press under an open records request show that there were 12 doses of the powerful sedative in the prison system's inventory as of the end of October, after the state carried out its 10th and final execution this year. Assuming none of the first five is halted or rescheduled, a new supply will have to be obtained or an alternate drug used to accommodate the Feb. 10 execution of Lester Bower Jr. for the killing of four men at a North Texas airplane hangar 30 years ago.

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  12. Arizona to change execution drugs after investigation of lengthy death of Joseph Rudolph WoodRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 22, 2014 | Nanaimo Daily News

    Arizona officials said Monday they are changing the drugs they use in executions after an inmate in July gasped repeatedly over the course of nearly two hours while being put to death. Arizona no longer will use the combination of midazolam, a sedative, and hydromorphone, a pain killer, according to a letter to Gov. Jan Brewer from Department of Corrections Director Charles Ryan.

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  13. Oklahoma official says state has execution drugsRead the original story

    Dec 19, 2014 | KRMG-AM Tulsa

    Oklahoma has procured the drugs it needs to execute four inmates early next year and plans to administer the same three it used in a botched execution this spring, just with an increased dose, the state's prison director told a federal judge on Friday. Department of Corrections Director Robert Patton said the agency plans to administer the drugs in a combination used successfully in 11 executions in Florida, one that he believes is "humane."

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  14. sedative addictionRead the original story

    Jul 9, 2010 | InteliHealth

    Sedative-hypnotic drugs -- commonly called "depressants" -- slow down or "depress" the activity of the brain. The best known are barbiturates and benzodiazepines .

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  15. Execution drug bill sent to KasichRead the original story

    Dec 17, 2014 | Toledo Blade

    Despite arguments that it cloaks one of the most solemn acts of government in secrecy, the Ohio House Wednesday gave final approval to a bill providing at least temporary anonymity to pharmacies that supply the state with drugs for executions. Gov. John Kasich is expected to sign House Bill 663 into law in hopes that a compounding pharmacy would be willing to make from scratch the state's execution drug of choice after its commercial European manufacturer refused to make it available for that purpose.

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  16. Lethal injection drug bill clears Ohio LegislatureRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 17, 2014 | The Madison Press

    The names of companies that provide Ohio with lethal injection drugs would be shielded under a proposal sent Wednesday to the governor. Some lawmakers have said the bill is needed to restart executions in the state.

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  17. Ohio House to consider lethal injection drug billRead the original story

    Dec 17, 2014 | NewsandSentinel.com

    The names of companies that provide Ohio with lethal injection drugs would be shielded under a proposal the state House is poised to vote on Wednesday. Some lawmakers have said the bill is needed to restart executions in the state.

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  18. In their viewRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 17, 2014 | Crescent-News.com

    It's unconscionable for Ohio's elected officials to disregard transparency and medical ethics in order to continue executing death-row inmates.

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  19. Editorial: Views from the OhioRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 17, 2014 | The Daily Record

    Hundreds of Ohio rape cases have been solved because of state Attorney General Mike DeWine's initiative to have old evidence examined, authorities say. Since he began the initiative three years ago, more than 5,600 "rape kits" have been tested, DeWine said Monday.

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  20. Tennessee high court considers identifying executionersRead the original story w/Photo

    Dec 15, 2014 | USA Today

    The Tennessee Supreme Court will considering Thursday whether to identify the names of the execution team and pharmacists working with the deadly drugs in a challenge to a 2013 state law that keeps Tennessee high court considers identifying executioners NASHVILLE - The Tennessee Supreme Court will considering Thursday whether to identify the names of the execution team and pharmacists working with the deadly drugs in a challenge to a 2013 state law that keeps Check out this story on USATODAY.com: http://usat.ly/1AzncW7 A group of inmates is fighting the death penalty protocol used in Tennessee, claiming it is unconstitutional and violates protections from cruel and unusual punishment.

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