University of Illinois Chicago

University of Illinois Chicago Newswire (Page 3)

Comprehensive Real-Time News Feed for University of Illinois Chicago. (Page 3)

Results 41 - 60 of 2,788 in University of Illinois Chicago

  1. Combined sewer systems lead to risk of illness after heavy rainsRead the original story

    Tuesday Apr 14 | Medical News Today

    Consumers whose drinking water can be contaminated by the release of untreated wastewater after heavy rains face increased risk for gastrointestinal illness, according to a report in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives. "Combined" sewer systems collect both sewage and stormwater runoff on the way to treatment facilities.

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  2. Unique UIC center will study alcohol's effect on genesRead the original story

    Monday Apr 13 | PressReleasePoint

    Funded by a five-year, $7 million federal grant, the University of Illinois at Chicago College of Medicine will create a new center, the first of its kind, to study the effect of long-term alcohol exposure on genes. The National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism, one of the National Institutes of Health, awarded the funding to establish a Center for Alcohol Research in Epigenetics .

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  3. Weight-Control Myth Keeps Many Women Smoking: StudyRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | News Max

    American women who believe smoking helps control weight are less likely than other female smokers to try quitting in response to higher cigarette prices and anti-smoking messages, a new study finds. "We found that concerns about weight are a significant barrier to quitting among U.K. smokers and U.S. female smokers who believe smoking helps them manage weight," lead author Ce Shang, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, said in a university news release.

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  4. Weight-Control Myths Keep Many U.S. Women SmokingRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | HON

    American women who believe smoking helps control weight are less likely than other female smokers to try quitting in response to higher cigarette prices and anti-smoking messages, a new study finds. "We found that concerns about weight are a significant barrier to quitting among U.K. smokers and U.S. female smokers who believe smoking helps them manage weight," lead author Ce Shang, of the University of Illinois at Chicago, said in a university news release.

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  5. Incumbent Lane falls to Curtis in 18th WardRead the original story

    Monday Apr 13 | Southwest News-Herald

    New aldermen will be representing the 15th, 16th and 18th wards following the Tuesday runoff elections. In the 18th Ward, the only race with an incumbent running, Ald.

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  6. Turning Bacterial Spores into Electromechanical Humidity SensorsRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | Machine Design

    Spacing between Graphene Quantum Dots changes, as a bacterial spore shrinks and expands in response to a controlled humidity. The dot spacing affects the cytobot's conductivity, which is measured as the sensory output.

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  7. New evidence for how green tea and apples could protect healthRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | PhysOrg Weblog

    The Institute of Food Research has published a new study that adds more to the growing body of evidence that certain compounds found naturally in foods have specific effects that help prevent chronic diseases. They have uncovered a mechanism by which polyphenols in green tea and apples affect a key signalling molecule, which could explain other studies that have shown how polyphenol-rich foods reduce risks of chronic diseases.

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  8. Clearfield Math Students Earn Trip to ChicagoRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | GantDaily.com

    Participants in the national math competition held at Clearfield are, from left: back row: Josh Anstead, Katlyne Fye, Herschel Johnson, Teacher Judi Bookhamer, Elliot Thorp, Caleb Strouse and Alana Kochan. In front row are: Matt Rowles, Zach Owens, Devin Carns, Diane Thompson, Sarah Hazel and Kerry Maines.

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  9. Report: Combined sewer systems can increase risk for gastrointestinal illnessRead the original story w/Photo

    Monday Apr 13 | Medical News

    Consumers whose drinking water can be contaminated by the release of untreated wastewater after heavy rains face increased risk for gastrointestinal illness, according to a report in the journal Environmental Health Perspectives . "Combined" sewer systems collect both sewage and stormwater runoff on the way to treatment facilities.

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  10. Storycorps's OutloudRead the original story

    Saturday Apr 11 | WBEZ-FM Chicago

    David Isay , StoryCorps founder and the recipient of numerous broadcasting honors, including six Peabody Awards and a MacArthur "Genius" Fellowship, and University of Illinois at Chicago gender studies professor Jennifer Brier lead an evening of insightful conversation about the OutLoud initiative in historical context with other LGBT oral history projects.

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  11. ChicagoTHE WATCHDOGS: Crooked couple's sweet UIC deal...Continue ReadingRead the original story w/Photo

    Saturday Apr 11 | Chicago Sun-Times

    A clout-heavy couple convicted of stealing more than $3 million in state grant money to support a lavish lifestyle of yacht-club memberships, luxury cars and vacation homes also had a sweetheart deal with the University of Illinois at Chicago that reaped them hundreds of thousands of dollars in profits, a Chicago Sun-Times investigation has found. A business owned by Leon Dingle Jr. and his wife, Karin Dingle, leased out a portion of a small, one-story building they owned on the West Side to UIC for storage.

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  12. UIC nursea s research helps moms bond with preemiesRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | Chicago Sun-Times

    Rosemary White-Traut, a University of Illinois at Chicago nurse, noticed that premature babies often missed out on needed human interaction because their mothers were afraid to disturb their tiny and fragile newborns. It was years ago that, Rosemary White-Traut, a University of Illinois at Chicago nurse, first noticed the mothers of premature babies who, afraid to disturb their tiny and fragile newborns to feed them, would just watch them sleep in their incubator.

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  13. Emanuel predicts 'mega-megadeal' to end spring legislative sessionRead the original story

    Friday Apr 10 | Chicago Sun-Times

    Mayor Rahm Emanuel predicted Friday that the Illinois General Assembly's spring session would run into overtime and culminate in a "mega-megadeal," exhorting supporters to join him in fending off Gov. Bruce Rauner's doomsday budget cuts. "I don't have enough resources in the city, even in a good budget, to make up for an absent state partnership," Emanuel said during a conference call with hundreds of business, community and religious leaders who helped re-elect him.

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  14. Cheer Championships in DaytonaFri, 10 Apr 2015 14:27:00 EDTRead the original story

    Friday Apr 10 | Daytona Beach News-Journal Online

    The University of Illinois at Chicago in action Thursday at the National Cheerleading Association and National Dance Association Collegiate Cheer & Dance Championships at the Ocean Center in Daytona Beach. University of South Carolina in action Thursday at the National Cheerleading Association and National Dance Association Collegiate Cheer & Dance Championships at the Ocean Center in Daytona Beach.

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  15. Puerto Rico exports its drug addicts to ChicagoRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | WBEZ-FM Chicago

    It all started about a year ago when I began noticing more homeless men in the Chicago neighborhood where I work. Back of the Yards is a community that faces some of the city's toughest problems: joblessness, crime, drug use.

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  16. Portland's Chicago-Based Police Reform Watchdogs May Not Replace Their 'Ears on the Ground'Read the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | The Pordland Mercury

    The head of a team of Chicago academics being paid to watchdog Portland's police reform says he's not sure whether he'll hire a new person to be the team's "ears on the ground," after former state Chief Justice Paul De Muniz resigned for health reasons this week. Following a sometimes-tense meeting with community members last night, Dr. Dennis Rosenbaum, a criminology professor at the University of Illinois, Chicago, told the Mercury he's still trying to figure out whether De Muniz should be replaced.

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  17. Where I was at 3 pm yesterdayRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | Environmental Economics

    Dr. Deidre McCloskey,a Distinguished Professor of Economics, History, English, and Communication, University of Illinois at Chicago, will give a talk titled "Use and Misuse of Statistical Methods" on Thursday, April 9 at 3 pm in room 118 in Anne Belk Hall. This is a talk that is accessible to all, without background in statistics.

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  18. Combined sewer systems lead to risk of illness after heavy rainsRead the original story

    Friday Apr 10 | Science Daily

    Consumers whose drinking water can be contaminated by the release of untreated wastewater after heavy rains face increased risk for gastrointestinal illness, according to a report. Many older cities such as Chicago have combined sewer systems -- along with 772 other communities, primarily in the Northeast, Great Lakes and Pacific Northwest, serving a total of 40 million people.

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  19. Make your home a home for the birdsRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | Science Daily

    The landscaping plants chosen by residents for their yards plays a much greater role in the diversity of native birds in suburban neighborhoods than do the surrounding parks, forest preserves, or streetside trees, say biologists at the University of Illinois at Chicago. The combined effects of a neighborhood's small yards has a greater impact on the variety of native birds than larger landscape features, says Amy Belaire, UIC doctoral candidate in biological science, who is first author on the study.

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  20. "Optocapacitance" Shines New Light on the BrainRead the original story w/Photo

    Friday Apr 10 | Scientific American

    A novel twist on the young field of optogenetics may provide a new way to study living human brains as well as offering innovative therapeutic uses. From time immemorial, philosophers, anatomists and scientists have pondered the inner workings of the brain.

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