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Pope Benedict XVI

Pope's abdication may be simply the act of a conscientiou...

His stepping down may also be the act of a man who sees a certain younger man whom he thinks would make an outstanding pope for our times and who wants to see him through to that position: "Of course, [the popes'] health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.” I see reasons to think Pope Benedict XVI would like to see Cardinal Peter Turkson get the job. Let us start with the pope’s own coat of arms, which is unusual.... There are a couple of things a passing pope does to influence who will be successor after his death. One is to stack the college of cardinals with the kind of people whom the pope believes are most likely to choose a leader for the church that will follow the path the pope has set. The other is to advance those cardinals he’d most like to see get the position of pope into the top slots. Pope Benedict XVI has made certain that Cardinal Peter Turkson is in a top slot in Rome. He appointed him President of the Pontifical Council for Justice and Peace. This is one of the church’s most international bodies, established during the Second Vatican Council. Pope Benedict also appointed him as a member of the Congregation for the Doctrine of Faith near and dear to Benedict’s heart. Once known as the Universal (Catholic) Inquisition, this is the body that Benedict, himself, led immediately prior to becoming pope. This office was originally run by popes, as the highest guardian of truth in the RCC. Consider, too, that in a world where Islamic Fundamentalism is the chief source of terror, this pope might have felt the Church and the world need a pope from Africa where Islam is particularly strong and a pope of color to downplay the immediate assumption in Muslims of many nations that the pope is just speaking from a largely white European interest." (Excerpt from: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ ) --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #2)

Pope Benedict XVI

Could the next pope be from Africa?

One reason Pope Benedict XVI might have resigned is to get the Black man into office that he longs to see there. Of course, his health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.” I see reasons to think Pope Benedict XVI would like to see Cardinal Peter Turkson get the job. Let us start with the pope’s own coat of arms, which is unusual. On few things are images more symbolic or as personally representative than on a coat of arms. The symbols are carefully chosen and simplified to say, “This is who I am. This is my personal and professional logo.” Among the roughly one-hundred coats of arms designed for popes, Benedict XVI’s is the only one to feature a human being. The left side of his shield bears the head of a black man wearing a crown. Many have asked questions about why this unusual charge, as such images on a shield are called, is there. Parts of Benedict XVI’s coat of arms are typical to papal coats of arms. At the crest is the papal crown. On all other coats of arms, the papal tiara is used, but Benedict XVI chose the mitre of the Bishop of Rome. Behind the shield one always finds the “Keys of Heaven,” spoken of in the Book of Revelation and understood by Catholics as given from Christ to Peter as the symbol of papal authority. It is the shield in the coat of arms that represents the individual most of all. The Black man with the crown is the “Moor of Freising” from the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising where Joseph Ratzinger was archbishop sometime prior to becoming pope. The bear on the right represents the patron saint of Munich and Freising. So, these may only be there to connect Benedict XVI to his former career path and homeland. The pope’s own written comments on the subject indicate he doesn’t know where the image came from originally, but apparently he liked it. In his 1998 book Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, he wrote, “For me, [the African king] is an expression of the universality of the Church.” If that universality is so central to him as a person that he wanted it on his coat of arms, he may want to see that universality expressed more concretely in the Church via the election of a black pope. He may want to “see that through,” so to speak. I"ve written much more about this for anyone interested in following the thinking further than there is room to share here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #5)

Pope Benedict XVI

Could the next pope be from Africa?

let’s consider one reason Pope Benedict XVI might have resigned. Of course, his health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.” I see reasons to think Pope Benedict XVI would like to see Cardinal Peter Turkson get the job. Let us start with the pope’s own coat of arms, which is unusual. On few things are images more symbolic or as personally representative than on a coat of arms. The symbols are carefully chosen and simplified to say, “This is who I am. This is my personal and professional logo.” Among the roughly one-hundred coats of arms designed for popes, Benedict XVI’s is the only one to feature a human being. The left side of his shield bears the head of a black man wearing a crown. Many have asked questions about why this unusual charge, as such images on a shield are called, is there. Parts of Benedict XVI’s coat of arms are typical to papal coats of arms. At the crest is the papal crown. On all other coats of arms, the papal tiara is used, but Benedict XVI chose the mitre of the Bishop of Rome. Behind the shield one always finds the “Keys of Heaven,” spoken of in the Book of Revelation and understood by Catholics as given from Christ to Peter as the symbol of papal authority. It is the shield in the coat of arms that represents the individual most of all. The Black man with the crown is the “Moor of Freising” from the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising where Joseph Ratzinger was archbishop sometime prior to becoming pope. The bear on the right represents the patron saint of Munich and Freising. So, these may only be there to connect Benedict XVI to his former career path and homeland. The pope’s own written comments on the subject indicate he doesn’t know where the image came from originally, but apparently he liked it. In his 1998 book Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, he wrote, “For me, [the African king] is an expression of the universality of the Church.” If that universality is so central to him as a person that he wanted it on his coat of arms, he may want to see that universality expressed more concretely in the Church via the election of a black pope. He may want to “see that through,” so to speak. I"ve written much more about this for anyone interested in following the thinking further than there is room to share here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #4)

Pope Benedict XVI

Pope Benedict XVI: 6 Surprising Facts

Nay. One doesn't need a dark conspiracy theory to see why he would step down: "consider one reason Pope Benedict XVI might have resigned. Of course, his health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.”" There is actually a huge number of reasons to think he may want a particular Black cardinal from Africa to be pope -- reasons rooted in an 800-year-old (according to the Vatican) Catholic prophecy about the succession of popes right to the last one and personal clues that can be seen in Pope Benedict XVI himself. I've posted a number of those here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #27)

Pope Benedict XVI

As pope resigns, Africa hopes for rise of its own

There are many interesting clues that would say, if Pope Benedict can influence the decision, he would like to see an African pope. I'll lay out a few here: On few things are images more symbolic or as personally representative than on a coat of arms. The symbols are carefully chosen and simplified to say, “This is who I am. This is my personal and professional logo.” Among the roughly one-hundred coats of arms designed for popes, Benedict XVI’s is the only one to feature a human being. The left side of his shield bears the head of a black man wearing a crown. Many have asked questions about why this unusual charge, as such images on a shield are called, is there. Parts of Benedict XVI’s coat of arms are typical to papal coats of arms. At the crest is the papal crown. On all other coats of arms, the papal tiara is used, but Benedict XVI chose the mitre of the Bishop of Rome. Behind the shield one always finds the “Keys of Heaven,” spoken of in the Book of Revelation and understood by Catholics as given from Christ to Peter as the symbol of papal authority. It is the shield in the coat of arms that represents the individual most of all. The Black man with the crown is the “Moor of Freising” from the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising where Joseph Ratzinger was archbishop sometime prior to becoming pope. The bear on the right represents the patron saint of Munich and Freising. So, these may only be there to connect Benedict XVI to his former career path and homeland. The pope’s own written comments on the subject indicate he doesn’t know where the image came from originally, but apparently he liked it. In his 1998 book Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, he wrote, “For me, [the African king] is an expression of the universality of the Church.” If that universality is so central to him as a person that he wanted it on his coat of arms, he may want to see that universality expressed more concretely in the Church via the election of a black pope. He may want to “see that through,” so to speak. I've laid out many other reasons than that, including fascinating parallels to an 800-year-old prophecy that, I am certain, most of the cardinals today are keenly aware of, for there was a book written about it a year ago, and there have been numerous articles about it recently. While readers here, may not be persuaded by prophecy, stop and think about how that misses the point. It is not whether you are persuaded by it, but whether Benedict XVI is. For those who want to follow this thinking more, you can find it here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #4)

Pope Benedict XVI

The Pope states he will resign, but theocracy will continue

The pope will not only make sure the papacy continues, but it will continue in the direction he wants to see it go. John Paul II gave him a college of cardinals already established by majority along Benedict XVI's conservative lines. Then Benedict had another seven years to shape the college more and to promote the people he'd most like to see as pope into top positions of the Church's government. So, even if he does not try to influence the upcoming convocation at all, he's already influenced it considerably. But let’s consider one reason Pope Benedict XVI might have resigned. Of course, his health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.” I see reasons to think Pope Benedict XVI would like to see Cardinal Peter Turkson get the job, and I've laid out those reasons for anyone interested, but it's more than I can write here, so I've put it ... here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #3)

Pope Benedict XVI

A Canadian pope? Ouellet touted as among leading candidat...

I don't think it will be a Canadian pope. I can see why Canadians would hope that, but you have to look at what is important to THIS pope because you can be sure he has done all he can to create a college of cardinals that will take the church and the papacy in the direction he thinks it should go. On few things are images more symbolic or as personally representative than on a coat of arms. The symbols are carefully chosen and simplified to say, “This is who I am. This is my personal and professional logo.” Among the roughly one-hundred coats of arms designed for popes, Benedict XVI’s is the only one to feature a human being. The left side of his shield bears the head of a black man wearing a crown. Many have asked questions about why this unusual charge, as such images on a shield are called, is there. Parts of Benedict XVI’s coat of arms are typical to papal coats of arms. At the crest is the papal crown. On all other coats of arms, the papal tiara is used, but Benedict XVI chose the mitre of the Bishop of Rome. Behind the shield one always finds the “Keys of Heaven,” spoken of in the Book of Revelation and understood by Catholics as given from Christ to Peter as the symbol of papal authority. It is the shield in the coat of arms that represents the individual most of all. The Black man with the crown is the “Moor of Freising” from the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising where Joseph Ratzinger was archbishop sometime prior to becoming pope. The bear on the right represents the patron saint of Munich and Freising. So, these may only be there to connect Benedict XVI to his former career path and homeland. The pope’s own written comments on the subject indicate he doesn’t know where the image came from originally, but apparently he liked it. In his 1998 book Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, he wrote, “For me, [the African king] is an expression of the universality of the Church.” If that universality is so central to him as a person that he wanted it on his coat of arms, he may want to see that universality expressed more concretely in the Church via the election of a black pope. He may want to “see that through,” so to speak. If you want to hear more about the ways this potential Black pope looks highly probable and even how he fits in with an 800-year-old prophecy, I've written more about it than I can share here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #4)

Pope Benedict XVI

Pope-ularity: Odds on Canadian Cardinal

I'll put my odds on another: "I find it intriguing that two of the leading contenders as successor for Benedict XVI are named “Peter.” It will be an especially interesting time ahead if they pick they pick the one of those two who is was born in the town of Romano. Whether he took the name Peter II or not, he would certainly be rightly known as Peter of Romano, the contemporary equivalent of the Latin Romanus, just because of his given name and birthplace. And I’m sure he greatly wants the job. The most favored choice among the two cardinals named Peter, however, is Peter Turkson of Ghana. Many were hoping he would be selected when Joseph Ratzinger was chosen to be pope and took the name Benedict XVI. They were hoping Cardinal Peter Turkson would be the first black pope, and there is good reason to think he will be chosen, in spite of how his name will give credence to the idea of a Satanic end-times Pope Peter II." ( http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ ) There is a 800-year-old prophecy made public by the Vatican 400 years ago that says the next pope will be the last pope and that his name will be Peter the Roman. The above article tells more about it, so I won't give all the details here; but I'll bet the cardinals are going to sweat this one out. THREE of the most favored candidates are named Peter -- a cardinal from Brazil, a cardinal from Ghana in Africa, and the one mentioned above. And, just as the cardinals would like to AVOID creating worldwide fear about the end of the world, lightning strikes the dome of St. PETER'S basilica on the day Pope Benedict the XVI resigns. It's going to be an interesting conclave. --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #3)

Pope Benedict XVI

REPORTS are coming out of Italy that Pope Benedict XVI ha...

"I find it intriguing that two of the leading contenders as successor for Benedict XVI are named “Peter.” It will be an especially interesting time ahead if they pick the one of those two who is was born in the town of Romano. Whether he took the name Peter II or not, he would certainly be rightly known as Peter of Romano [matching the famous prophecy about the last pope], just because of his given name and birthplace. And I’m sure he greatly wants the job. The most favored choice among the two cardinals named Peter, however, is Peter Turkson of Ghana. Many were hoping he would be selected when Joseph Ratzinger was chosen to be pope and took the name Benedict XVI. They were hoping Cardinal Peter Turkson would be the first black pope, and there is good reason to think he will be chosen, in spite of how his name will give credence to the idea of a Satanic end-times Pope Peter II." ( http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ ) This will be a most interesting conclave. --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #11)

Pope Benedict XVI

Conclave to pick new pope to begin mid-March

I think it would be safe to venture that the RC College of Cardinals probably does not want to foment end-time hysteria and Satanic conspiracies about their next pope; yet they are on the brink of doing so. Most of them are well aware of the famous 800-year-old Prophecy of the Popes, attributed to St. Malachy. It is still widely popular today. That prophecy predicts the end-times pope will be called "Peter the Roman." AND that prophecy states that the pope they are choosing now will be the last pope. (The prophecy describes every pope from the time it was made, so its easy to count down the list to see how many popes it envisioned and know where we are now. Many of the popes it gave their actual name, though the prophecy was only released by the Vatican hundreds of years after it was supposedly written by St. Malachy, and those that are named are all prior to the date when the prophecy was released from the Vatican's secret archives. Anyway, this makes for a hugely fascinating conclave because the last thing the present cardinals would want to do is stir up belief that this is the end of the world, and yet THREE of their MOST FAVORED candidates for the next pope are named ... "Peter." And ONE of them was born in a town named "Romano. " IF they choose him, he literally will be "Peter the Roman." Because the prophecy is widely known and is enjoying a popular resurgence right now, it’s pretty safe to say the College of Cardinals is fully aware of it, and there is every reason for them to resist appointing anyone that would either have as his given name or take as his chosen name the name “Peter” during its next papal conclave. This, of all conclaves, is not the one to elect someone with that name, having resisted the name Peter for almost 2,000 years. So, what do you do, when your favorite candidates are named "Peter?" Of all the timing! And just when you thought the 2012 Mayan excitement was over. Now we have St. PETER'S Basilica getting struck by lightning on the day pope resigns and a near-earth asteroid passing by ... all kinds of things to get people really excited about what is going to come out of this conclave. Stay tuned. (And if you want to read more about the prophecy for fun and curiosity sake and about the candidates named Peter, I've just posted an article here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #8)

Pope Benedict XVI

Next pope?

Peter Turkson is a very interesting choice. There is a prophecy purported to be 800 years old that the Catholic church released 400 years ago, though it takes no stand on its authenticity; and this prophecy predicts that the next pope (based on the number of popes listed in the prophecy) will be the last pope. After his name, the prophecy says, literally, "The End." And the name? Petrus Romanus -- Peter of Rome. The last pope according to the prophecy will be Pope Peter II, and, as the article above says, Peter Turkson is the odds-on-favorite to be the next pope in Rome. I've written a lot more about that than I can post here, so if you're interested... http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ Be glad to dialogue with you about it on my blog --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #4)

Pope Benedict XVI

Lightning strikes the Vatican -- literally

Interesting that you wrote that, because I just finished writing and posting an article about that prophecy and about the two candidates high on the papal list who would fulfill that prophecy in an amazing way if chosen: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ The Prophecy of St. Malachy that you speak of is very interesting in how some see that it accurately predicted every pope. (There is a little room to say some of the matches are a stretch, but many are right on, and the stretches are, at least, not implausible.) Pope Peter II may, indeed, be waiting in the wings. That, in itself, might be exciting enough for a pope who believes in prophecies, to step aside just so that he can see these final prophesied days unfold. (While some readers here probably don't believe in prophecies, remember that the pope does; so, they may very well guide his actions, and the reasons he might step aside because of them are fascinating (without needing to be darkly conspiratorial -- more like rational when thinking about a man who believes in prophecy). http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #4)

Pope Benedict XVI

Why the next pope should be African

There is an interesting clue in Pope Benedict XVI's coat of arms that the next pope may, indeed, be a black man from Africa: On few things are images more symbolic or as personally representative than on a coat of arms. The symbols are carefully chosen and simplified to say, “This is who I am. This is my personal and professional logo.” Among the roughly one-hundred coats of arms designed for popes, Benedict XVI’s is the only one to feature a human being. The left side of his shield bears the head of a black man wearing a crown. Many have asked questions about why this unusual charge, as such images on a shield are called, is there. Parts of Benedict XVI’s coat of arms are typical to papal coats of arms. At the crest is the papal crown. On all other coats of arms, the papal tiara is used, but Benedict XVI chose the mitre of the Bishop of Rome. Behind the shield one always finds the “Keys of Heaven,” spoken of in the Book of Revelation and understood by Catholics as given from Christ to Peter as the symbol of papal authority. It is the shield in the coat of arms that represents the individual most of all. The Black man with the crown is the “Moor of Freising” from the coat of arms of the Archdiocese of Munich and Freising where Joseph Ratzinger was archbishop sometime prior to becoming pope. The bear on the right represents the patron saint of Munich and Freising. So, these may only be there to connect Benedict XVI to his former career path and homeland. The pope’s own written comments on the subject indicate he doesn’t know where the image came from originally, but apparently he liked it. In his 1998 book Milestones: Memoirs 1927-1977, he wrote, “For me, [the African king] is an expression of the universality of the Church.” If that universality is so central to him as a person that he wanted it on his coat of arms, he may want to see that universality expressed more concretely in the Church via the election of a black pope. He may want to “see that through,” so to speak. Since the “Moor’s head” has been on his own coat of arms during two different ministerial posts, he has undoubtedly seen it a lot and thought about what it means to him a lot. In fact, it was so important to him that, on his coat of arms as cardinal, he had it placed twice. I can't put everything about the most interesting black and, I think, likely Black, African papal candidate here because of lack of space, but he also has a VERY strong tie to one of the oldest and best-known Catholic prophecies about the succession of popes, which I've posted here: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #15)

Pope Benedict XVI

And they're off: Papal campaigning gets under way

The dark horse in the race for the role of Peter II is not the Black man -- Peter Turkson. Bookies are making Turkson the odds-on favorite of all the candidates. The dark horse is the whitest man — Cardinal Tarcisio Pietro Evasio Bertone. He is considered one of the other most likely candidates because Benedict promoted him in 2006 to be the Cardinal Secretary of State, another position close to the pope and about as international as it gets. He is the other Peter hales from Romano Canavese in Turin, Italy, home of the famous shroud. In 2007 Benedict appointed Cardinal Bertone Camerlengo of the Holy Roman Church (Chamberlain). As such, his primary duty is administration of the entire Roman Catholic Church during the vacancy of the Holy See — kind of like vice president. But he has been the subject of much controversy, including his involvement in the release of the Secrets of Fatima, where he is accused of covering the truth. I've been writing about him here, if you are interested in more about him and about the two Peters who could become the long-anticipated Pope Peter II -- a race between a Black man for Ghana and and a White man from Italy. http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #15)

Pope Benedict XVI

Pope says he's resigning for the 'good of church'

Let’s consider one reason Pope Benedict XVI might have resigned. Of course, his health is the main reason, and I think his health and his long-expressed wish, even before he was elected pope, to retire mean we do not need any conspiracies to explain the peculiarity of his resignation. That doesn’t mean, however, there are not other significant factors pressing upon Benedict that influenced his decision. Human choices often have many pros and cons one weighs carefully before making a decision like this, and it often takes more than one factor to tip the balance. The one contributing factor that I think might have the most influence in getting anyone to resign before he dies is the hope of having influence over the choice of his successor. There is nothing dark or conspiratorial about that. If one knows his health is rapidly declining, and he has lost the strength to do the job so that it is a great burden to him, AND he has a particular person in mind he would most like to see get the position, that would be good incentive to say, “I’d like to step aside so that my chosen can take the mantel from me and I can help make sure that happens and can enjoy seeing him do it.” Moreover, if he has a favored candidate or two, he might like to live awhile to enjoy seeing them carry on the ministry. I have a couple to suggest: http://thegreatrec ession.info/blog/w ho-will-be-the-nex t-pope-peter-the-r oman-of-saint-mala chys-prophecy-of-t he-popes/ --Knave Dave  (Feb 14, 2013 | post #5)