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Genetics News

News on Genetics continually updated from thousands of sources around the net.

3 hrs ago | Medical Daily

Newly Discovered Prostate Cancer Genetic Variants Could Make Testing For Risk Better

Scientists have identified 23 new genetic variants that indicate a person's risk of prostate cancer, enabling them to explain up to a third of inherited risk. Screening for prostate cancer has seen huge advances, with scientists recently identifying 23 new genetic variants associated with risk of the disease.

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Related Topix: Prostate Cancer, Health, Medicine

7 hrs ago | Reuters

Ocean algae can evolve fast to tackle climate change: study

Tiny marine algae can evolve fast enough to cope with climate change in a sign that some ocean life may be more resilient than thought to rising temperatures and acidification, a study showed. Evolution is usually omitted in scientific projections of how global warming will affect the planet in coming decades because genetic changes happen too slowly to help larger creatures such as cod, tuna or whales.

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Related Topix: Global Warming, Medicine

9 hrs ago | Bucksfreepress.co.uk

Epilepsy research fund gets A 50,000 windfall

RESEARCH into the genetic causes of epilepsy has received a cash boost after a A 50,000 donation from the Buckinghamshire Freemasons. The group gave the Chalfont St Peter-based Epilepsy Society the cash windfall in order for the charity to fund work into finding a molecular cause to the condition.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Life, Charity

13 hrs ago | Philly.com

Optogenetics unlocks secrets of the body

One of the hot research techniques these days, "optogenetics," uses gene therapy to deliver light-sensitive proteins to specific cells. Then researchers use light to control the cells.

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Related Topix: Genetics, Medicine, Biology, Science, Philadelphia, PA, University of Pennsylvania

18 hrs ago | Medical News Today

Nintedanib in combination with paclitaxel achieves total remission of ...

The experimental drug nintedanib, combined with standard chemotherapy with paclitaxel, causes a total remission of tumours in 50% of patients suffering from early HER-2- negative breast cancer , the most common type of breast cancer. These are the conclusions of the Phase I Clinical Trial, sponsored by the Spanish National Cancer Research Centre and carried out by CNIO s Breast Cancer Clinical Research Unit.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Health, Breast Cancer, Lung Cancer, Oncology

Sat Sep 13, 2014

Science Daily

Zebrafish Model of a Learning and Memory Disorder Shows Better Way to Target Treatment

Using a zebrafish model of a human genetic disease called neurofibromatosis , a team from the Perelman School of Medicine at the University of Pennsylvania has found that the learning and memory components of the disorder are distinct features that will likely need different treatment approaches. They published their results this month in Cell Reports .

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Related Topix: Medicine, University of Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania, Pennsylvania Government

South China Morning Post

Body upgrades nearing reality, but only for the rich, 'Sapiens' author says

Through the power of technology, humans are set to upgrade ourselves and surmount evolution. Ultimately, we can become entirely new beings that set the stage for a post-human future.

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Related Topix: Medicine

CiteULike

Molecular genetics of mouse serotonin neurons across the lifespan.

New molecular genetics approaches have been developed over the past several years to study brain serotonin neuron development and the roles of 5-HT neurons in behavior and physiology. These approaches were enabled by manipulation of the gene encoding the Pet-1 ETS transcription factor whose expression in the brain is restricted to developing and adult 5-HT neurons.

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Related Topix: Genetics, Biology, Science, Medicine

Time

Woman Receives First Stem Cell Therapy Using Her Own Skin Cells

Researchers at the RIKEN Center for Developmental Biology in Japan surgically transplanted a sheet of retinal pigment cells into the eye of a 70-year old woman on Friday. The cells are the first induced pluripotent stem cells, or iPS cells, given to a human patient.

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Related Topix: Stem Cell Research, Science / Technology, Medicine, Macular Degeneration, Health

Science Daily

Sickle cell disease: Attempting to improve transition from child to adult care

Sickle cell disease had been considered a pediatric ailment since people with it generally didn't live to adulthood. Pediatricians report that 95% now live to their 20th birthday.

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Related Topix: Pediatrics, Drugs

Science Daily

Potential link between assisted reproduction, autism: No link found

Over the past five years, several studies have focused on infertility treatment, partly because of the coincidental rise in both the diagnosis of autism and the use of assisted reproduction. A recent study examined a potential link, and concluded that there is none.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Health, Infertility

Fri Sep 12, 2014

Science Daily

Protein appears to protect against bone loss in arthritis

A small protein named GILZ appears to protect against the bone loss that often accompanies arthritis and its treatment, researchers report. Arthritis as well as aging prompt the body to make more fat than bone, and the researchers have previously shown GILZ can restore a more youthful, healthy mix.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Arthritis, Inflammation, Medical College of Georgia, Prednisone (generic), Deltasone, Orasone

Science Daily

Worldwide study demonstrates accuracy of genetic analyses

Physicians envision a future in which genomic data from patients is heavily used to manage care, but experts have questioned the accuracy and reliability of these analyses. Now, a study by 150 researchers in 12 countries finds real strength and agreement across RNA genomic sequencing techniques and laboratories -- as well as ways to improve what little variability exists to set a new high standard.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Food and Drug Administration

Science Daily

Microbes evolve faster than ocean can disperse them

Scientists have created an advanced model aimed at exploring the role of neutral evolution in the biogeographic distribution of ocean microbes. Over the past sev eral decades, ecol o gists have come to under stand that both natural selec tion and neu tral evolution -- that vari a tion within and between species is caused by genetic drift and random mutations -- play a role in the bio geo graphic pat terns of ocean microbes.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Northeastern University, Oceanography

New Hampshire Public Radio -

Could Genetics Hold The Answer To Curing Autism?

Geneticist Wendy Chung describes what it's like to chip away at the mysteries of autism, and the excitement of uncovering tiny but critical clues. Wendy Chung is the director of clinical research at the Simons Foundation Autism Research Initiative , which does both basic and applied science to serve people affected by autism spectrum disorders.

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Related Topix: Medicine

PhysOrg Weblog

Endometriosis a burden on women's lives

Endometriosis often takes a long time to be diagnosed and affects all areas of a women's life, a study has found. Research led by Monash University's Kate Young published in the Journal of Family Planning and Reproductive Health Care found that endometriosis affects women 's sex lives, personal relationships , work life, and emotional wellbeing.

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Related Topix: Endometriosis, Medicine, Health, Infertility, Preventive Medicine

Science Daily

How bacteria battle fluoride

Two studies provide new insights into the mechanisms that allow bacteria to resist fluoride toxicity, information that could eventually help inform new strategies for treating harmful bacterial diseases. Researchers have determined key structural differences that allow a subset of CLC transporters to preferentially select fluoride over chloride, which can help bacteria expel toxic fluoride.

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Related Topix: Dentistry, Medicine

Thu Sep 11, 2014

Brandon Sun

Business Highlights

No Silicon Valley company better embodies the promise and the pitfalls of working in health care than DNA testing firm 23andMe. Launched in 2006 to a flurry of media coverage, the Mountain View, California-based company seemed to have every strategic advantage: millions in startup cash, celebrity endorsements, and a chief executive married to one of the co-founders of Google.

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Related Topix: Startups, 23andMe, WebMD, Medicine, Food and Drug Administration, Marketing, Economics News, Bankruptcy

Infection Control Today

Our Microbes are a Rich Source of Drugs, UCSF Researchers Discover

A scientific team led by UCSF microbiome expert Michael Fischbach, PhD, identified more than 3,000 clusters of bacterial genes at different body sites that contain the blueprints for cellular factories that make drug-like molecules. One of the molecules discovered based on gene-cluster identification, an antibiotic the researchers named lactocillin, is assembled by enzymes encoded by genes within the circular DNA plasmid of the bacterium, Lactobacillus gasseri, a common resident of the vagina.

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Related Topix: Medicine, UC San Francisco

Bioscience Technology

Study Links Genetic Mutation to Melanoma Progression

Dartmouth researchers have found that the genetic mutation BRAFV600E , frequently found in metastatic melanoma, not only secretes a protein that promotes the growth of melanoma tumor cells, but can also modify the network of normal cells around the tumor to support the disease's progression. Targeting this mutation with Vemurafenib reduces this interaction, and suggests possible new treatment options for melanoma therapy.

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Related Topix: Medicine, Biology, Science, Biochemistry, Skin Cancer, Health

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