MANILA: China to Philippines: Quit Scarborough Shoal

Apr 18, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: Asia News Network

China has asked all Philippine vessels to leave immediately Scarborough Shoal and sent a second aircraft buzzing over the area to scare away Filipino fishermen, officials said yesterday.

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RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Delta, Canada

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#9273
Aug 6, 2012
 
heeee heeee hooooo hoooooo hoooo hoooo heeee heeee

Why U.S. Must Get Over Renminbi
June 22, 2012
By Yukon Huang

U.S. politicians are tempted to blame Chinese currency manipulation for the country’s economic woes. But doing so is unhelpful.
Why U.S. Must Get Over Renminbi

In a close election year, the easy option for politicians is to blame the United States’ economic woes on China. The U.S. bilateral deficit with China hit a record $295 billion for last year. Protectionist sentiments are running high with recent complaints filed with the WTO that China doesn’t follow the rules. Passage of a countervailing tariff bill exemplifies the skirmishes that are coming. These efforts are bolstered by repeated calls for the renminbi to be revalued upwards to offset China’s alleged currency manipulation.

The problem is that this isn’t the real story.

From China’s perspective, admonitions that the renminbi is significantly undervalued seem devoid of logic. China’s current account surplus has declined from 10 percent of GDP five years ago to less than 3 percent last year and many project even further declines. Moreover, Beijing finds it perplexing that after steadily appreciating the renminbi by nearly 40 percent in real terms since 2005, critics say that the renminbi is still undervalued by the same 20 percent or more as if nothing has happened over the past five years.

Much of the confusion comes from focusing on the still huge U.S.-China bilateral trade imbalances, rather than looking at it from a global perspective.

Chinese policy makers are reminded that the United States took a similar approach in complaining decades ago that an undervalued yen was the major reason for Japan’s sustained trade surpluses. That the Japanese yen appreciated from 240 to 80 to a dollar in response to the 1985 Plaza Accord and yet the country continued to run a surplus until its recent nuclear disaster reminds the Chinese leadership that factors other than the exchange rate are far more important in shaping trade balances.

The truth is that China’s surpluses aren’t driving America’s deficits. This is illustrated by the differences in timing for when changes to both countries’ trade balances occurred. The U.S. trade deficit began increasing rapidly around 1998 and peaked around 2005. China’s trade surpluses began increasing around 2005 and peaked in 2008. This pattern suggests that U.S. deficits and China’s surpluses aren’t directly related, but reflect global shifts and country specific circumstances.

Clearly,“manipulating” the value of the renminbi had little to do with the emergence of China’s trade surplus since its value was pegged to the dollar until 2005. And only as the renminbi began to appreciate, did China’s surplus increase.

One could argue that China’s reluctance to allow the renminbi to appreciate even more rapidly after 2005 allowed surpluses to grow larger. However, more rapid appreciation would likely not have reduced U.S. trade deficits but only transferred some of the China specific surpluses to other Asian countries as long as the U.S. continued to run major fiscal deficits.

The driving force behind the U.S. deficits and China’s surpluses lies not in exchange rates but in structural factors that built up over time. Three factors largely explain the emergence of China’s trade surpluses: surging U.S. consumption that fueled import demand, maturation of the East Asian production sharing network centered on China, and ratcheting up of China’s savings rates.

http://thediplomat.com/2012/06/22/why-u-s-mus...
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9274
Aug 6, 2012
 
China uses its claims of "indisputable sovereignty" to neutralize neighboring countries cliaims to EEZ's according to UNCLOS; in China's groupthink, the concept of the EEZ is not even activated. To my knowledge there has bever been such an expansive claim to an entire body of water as maritime sovereign "territory" since the Roman Empire's Mare Nostrum which as excusable seeing as how the Roman Empire surrounded the Mediterranian on all sides. China however, has these inconveinient little neighbors it has to share the waters to its South with, and it it doesn't appear to like sharing.
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9275
Aug 6, 2012
 
China had to hide its intention because it did not have the means to defend what it claimed, claims that it is revealing bit by bit today. This is understood, but not understandable; not from a responsible permanent member of the UNSC.

Because, then:
- When China said: we pursue a peaceful policy, people are entitled to infer: inversely proportional to China growing military.
- When China said: we settle disputes according to International Law, people can interpret: not the current International Law, but the Law a stronger China can bend.
- When China said: we are prepared to sign a treaty,“when time is ripe”, people will deduce: when China feels it can violate with impunity.
- When China said: NO FIRST USE OF NUCLEAR WEAPONS, people conclude that China said:“SUCKERS IF YOU BELIEVE ME”.
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9276
Aug 6, 2012
 
Russians have shot at and imprisoned Chinese fishermen.
There's a pecking order in toeing the line. China looms over it's smaller southern neighbors, and in turn Russia looms over its smaller southern neighbor.
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9277
Aug 6, 2012
 
too many have been willing to entertain the ridiculous and overarching claims of the PRC in regards to the SCS in order to remain diplomatic, only to further encourage such grandstanding on the part of the PRC. The more it is made clear that such claims are ridiculous the sooner it will force the PRC into a more reasonable mindset and help decrease the risk of conflict.

This is not to say the PRC has no claim to any part of the SCS (they have their EEZ after all), and those areas which fall outside of any claimants EEZ can be open for discussion about joint exploitation and utilization; what cannot be open for discussion are such mad claims made by the PRC which risk plunging the region and even the world into war.
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9278
Aug 6, 2012
 
the overarching question in all this is "if someone doesn't put a challenge to the extraterritorial claims of the PRC, then who will?" How long before the PRC feels that it can move from blocking off areas with fishing and maritime surveillance boats to using military vessels or–worse–instigating conflicts to unjustly claim resources? Furthermore, are we turning a blind eye towards the beginnings of something far worse, as Western Europe did in the early months of WWII?
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9280
Aug 6, 2012
 
commentators such as (put name here of all the 50centers in this forum), no doubt, represent the hardline extreme of PRC posters here–may decry "imperialist" powers such as the United States and its lackeys (read: anyone else who might trump China's "destiny"), the reality is that the PRC is acting just as imperialist as those it criticizes; as someone else mentioned, not since the Roman Empire have we seen an attempt like that of the PRC to turn a body of water into an area of exclusive sovereignty where none may pass without permission. This, coupled with the development and deployment of Anti-Access/Area Denial weapons such as the DF-21D suggests that the PRC is going to attempt something that will provoke the US to act in the defense of others……and it wants to ensure that the US will pay too high a price to intervene in whatever conflict is on the horizon.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Delta, Canada

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#9281
Aug 6, 2012
 
Can China’s Consumers Save West?
January 04, 2012
By John Berthelsen

China’s huge domestic market has long fueled dreams that once its consumers are unleashed, rising demand will help heal ailing Western economies. Don’t count on it.
Can China’s Consumers Save West?
Related Features

Although a long succession of Western leaders, bankers and finance officials have held out the holy grail of the Chinese consumer’s purchase of Western exports as the savior of flagging economies, it may well remain a distant dream.

It’s certainly true that China, with an embarrassing $3 trillion in foreign exchange reserves and trade and current account surpluses that amount to 10 percent of gross domestic product, has been seeking to drive up imports.

Yu Ping, vice chairman of the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade, told reporters at the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation forum in Hawaii in November that the current five-year plan is focused on balancing imports and exports. The plan, he said,“demonstrates China’s resolution to improve its status in technological development as well as its determination to leverage the country’s massive domestic market.” As an example of that resolve, Vice Minister of Commerce Zhong Shan said in Shanghai in September that the commerce ministry was considering cutting taxes on imported consumer goods and was soliciting guidelines to encourage more imports. Andy Rothman, the China macro strategist for CLSA in Hong Kong, in a recent report pointed out that China’s share of personal consumption expenditure for U.S. goods has doubled over the past decade, with U.S. exports of electronics, agricultural and other products to China rising by 468 percent from 2000 to 2010.

Still, there are formidable structural obstacles to raising consumer spending in China that could take decades to unravel. Chinese household savings are as high as 50 percent, partly due to the region’s traditional conservatism, but also because the country lacks a social safety net. Pensions are almost nonexistent, along with reliable health insurance – either government or private. The education system is equally troubled, to the point where families who want to give their children adequate schooling must send them to private institutions. While the university system is improving, many wealthy Chinese send their children overseas.

Consumers are also cautious. According to government statistics, private household consumption was only 37 percent of gross domestic product in 2009, down from 49 percent in 1990, a fact that’s likely best explained by the massive rise in GDP over the period. In the United States, by contrast, household consumption accounts for 70 percent of GDP, including spending on health care by both individuals and government.

http://thediplomat.com/2012/01/04/can-china%E...
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9282
Aug 6, 2012
 
China's solution to its regional territorial claims is a bigger gun.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Delta, Canada

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#9283
Aug 6, 2012
 
heee heee hoooo hooooooo hoooo hooo heeee heeee hooo hooo heee heee....

.
.

Why the Chinese Trade Deficit Is a Positive Signal
Published: Monday, 12 Mar 2012 | 1:35 AM ET

By: Ansuya Harjani
Assistant Producer, CNBC Asia

While China logged its largest monthly trade deficit in two decades in February, market watchers say the pick up in imports is positive as it reflects strength in the country’s domestic economy.

“Imports surged more than 30 percent - it means domestic demand is strong, it will drive growth, and that's good news,” Dariusz Kowalczyk, Chief Investment Strategist, Credit Agricole, told CNBC on Monday.

Imports rose at a faster-than-expected rate of 39.6 percent year on year in February from a 15.3 percent contraction in January. While, exports climbed at a slower-than-expected rate of 18.4 percent, compared to a contraction of 0.5 percent in the previous month. As a result, China’s trade balance turned to a deficit of $31.5 billion, far exceeding expectations for a deficit of $4.9 billion.

Uwe Parpart, MD & Head of Research, Reorient Financial Markets, agrees that surging imports are an encouraging sign, adding that the data boosts the case for investing in mainland consumer stocks.

“What surprised (me) is that people seem to be complaining about Chinese trade deficit all of a sudden when everybody's been calling for it for years. China is finally importing more than it’s exporting. That's the restructuring everyone's been asking for,” Parpart said.

http://www.cnbc.com/id/46701809/Why_the_Chine...
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9284
Aug 6, 2012
 
This “Territory (e.g. nine-dotted line) takes precedence over UNCLOS” subject has been debated to death on this site as well as all over the world, yet China and her army of 50centers drag this old rag out with exactly same silly arguments and posts as if it was new here again, it makes people wonder whether China and her army of 50centers have some kind of deficiencies in undersanding that the entire rest of the world laughs at their baseless claims to sovereignty in the waters to the South of China and at their childish propaganda and overblown rhetoric.
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9285
Aug 6, 2012
 
You have to accept that when the PRC uses the universally understood terms "peace", "international law", "territorial seas", "high seas", "history", and even the five canons of Confucius teachings "humanity", "politeness", "respect", "truth" and "parole", it is always with the caveat of the PRC invention "with Chinese characteristics".
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9286
Aug 6, 2012
 
I think another issue is being overlooked – why does China claim all these islands? Sure seems they want the oil.
If they get that oil – will it be sold on the open market as all oil is now sold? Or will it become the exclusive property of China? Right now we have an open market system of oil sales – which seems the best so far. Everyone has a chance to bid for the oil. But if a country starts to restrict oil from the market – this sets a very dangerous precedent and will force other nations to start doing the same – now that is WWIII for sure!
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9287
Aug 6, 2012
 
The first communiqué text submitted in Phnom Penh was drafted jointly by Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Vietnam. This text was turned down by the Chair, and only the Chair. So, Indonesia, Malaysia, Philippines and Vietnam were not "diplomatic" enough? According to Hor Namhong or to Beijing?
Americans so easily FOOL

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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#9288
Aug 6, 2012
 
Don the Chinese wrote:
China's new tactic to claim ownership of SCS:
Increase use of disguised fishing fleprovoke this incident (say death of a couple of Chinese "fishermen").
Like chinaman CEV disguising as chinaman Don the Chinese or chinaman Donkey Kong in here.

Not everybody is that low IQ like you chinaman CEV.

China has the world largest fishing community and fleet. And they fish all over the world.
In SCS alone, there are 100,000 fishermen!
More than the entire Armed Forces of Philippines.
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE

Delta, Canada

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#9289
Aug 6, 2012
 
EVERYBODYS HAPPY wrote:
We will take a few Pinays as wives. This should improve their lot in life.
to anybody thinking about marrying a Filipina...

sure you can get a nice looking tight little brown Filipina

but when you marry a Filipina you marry her beggar family...

the whole family becomes beggars...

20 to 50 year old grown men and women will be crying and begging for money (give me da moneeeeeeeeeee)

best option is if you have to marry the girl and move her far away from the beggar family...
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9290
Aug 6, 2012
 
China CAN NOT prove her claims by telling to all people that China owns “this and that” since in ancient times. China tried to brandished chinese name to those islands and shoals to make it sounds like China really owns them. Small countries like Philippines practice jurisdiction over scarborough shoal and other islands within their EEZ as mandated by international laws and supported by significant treaties and history very much different on barbaric China.
Americans so easily FOOL

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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#9291
Aug 6, 2012
 
Chinaman CEV or Don the Chinese wrote:
The first communiqué text submitted in Phnom Penh was drafted joiording to Hor Namhong or to Beijing?
No matter how many LIES you post, ASEAN will not joined your PRIVATE WAR which AQUINO is initiating on behalf of USA.

ASEAN stance is very STRAIGHT FORWARD!

ASEAN are not a MILITARY BLOC and all issue to be discussed BILATERALLY between the claimants.

Hahahahah
Don the Chinese

Quezon City, Philippines

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#9292
Aug 6, 2012
 
There is no need to fight over the EEZ. If all accept UNCLOS, they have the option of peacefully settling their disputes through ITLOS.(and China has the privilege of a judge sitting in this court)

Needless to say, if peace is not China's objective, she is free to gamble with the use of dark force. But then don't cry if, by miscalculation China end up like Nazy Germany or Imperial Japan.
Americans so easily FOOL

Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia

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#9293
Aug 6, 2012
 
RESISTANCE IS FUTILE wrote:
Can China’s Consumers Save West?
January 04, 2012
By John Berthelsen
China’s huge domestic market has long fueled dreams that once its consumers are unleashed, rising demand will help heal ailing Western economies. Don’t count on it.
Can China’s Consumers Save West?
Related Features
Although a long succession of Western leaders, bankers and finance officials have held out the holy grail of the Chinese consumer’s purchase of Western exports as the savior of flagging economies, it may well remain a distant dream.
It’s certainly true that China, with an embarrassing $3 trillion in foreign exchange reserves and trade and current account surpluses that amount to 10 percent of gross domestic product, has been seeking to drive up imports.
Yu Ping, vice chairman of the China Council for the Promotion of International Trade, told reporters at the Asia Pacific Economic Co-operation forum in Hawaii in November that the current five-year plan is focused on balancing imports and exports. The plan, he said,“demonstrates China’s resolution to improve its status in technological development as well as its determination to leverage the country’s massive domestic market.” As an example of that resolve, Vice Minister of Commerce Zhong Shan said in Shanghai in September that the commerce ministry was considering cutting taxes on imported consumer goods and was soliciting guidelines to encourage more imports. Andy Rothman, the China macro strategist for CLSA in Hong Kong, in a recent report pointed out that China’s share of personal consumption expenditure for U.S. goods has doubled over the past decade, with U.S. exports of electronics, agricultural and other products to China rising by 468 percent from 2000 to 2010.
Still, there are formidable structural obstacles to raising consumer spending in China that could take decades to unravel. Chinese household savings are as high as 50 percent, partly due to the region’s traditional conservatism, but also because the country lacks a social safety net. Pensions are almost nonexistent, along with reliable health insurance – either government or private. The education system is equally troubled, to the point where families who want to give their children adequate schooling must send them to private institutions. While the university system is improving, many wealthy Chinese send their children overseas.
Consumers are also cautious. According to government statistics, private household consumption was only 37 percent of gross domestic product in 2009, down from 49 percent in 1990, a fact that’s likely best explained by the massive rise in GDP over the period. In the United States, by contrast, household consumption accounts for 70 percent of GDP, including spending on health care by both individuals and government.
The low IQ PINYOY here will not understand because their is a BANANA economy and they THINK it is the most important in the world.

Funny things is the payments are remitted home directly to families!!!! Hahahahahah

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