Illinois Sheriff Predicts Pot Will Be Legalized

Full story: Fox2Now 30
The sheriff of St. Clair County tells FOX 2 he believes the time has come to de-criminalize possession of small amounts of marijuana. Full Story
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gus

O Fallon, IL

#1 Oct 5, 2010
I think Jaco must be hitting the pipe. I couldn't tell what the hell Justice was trying to say at the end of the story.
zach

Park Hills, MO

#2 Oct 6, 2010
mass produce it in a thc chewing gum! like nicorette!
Issues

Saint Louis, MO

#3 Oct 6, 2010
who cares.....I hope it never happens...all it will do is to cheer up some n*&&#$
Scott

Saint Louis, MO

#4 Oct 6, 2010
Are they actually confiscating vehicles from people possesing small amounts of weed? Unbelievable!
Kimmie

Saint Louis, MO

#5 Oct 6, 2010
State of Illinois already has a law that you can be taxed for for selling weed or other controlled substance. If you have not heard of it before it is a stamp. Dealers should purchase a stamp place it on their bags to avoid getting a state tax lien on their property. I am not sure how long this law has been in effect but I believe for quite some time. So bottom line is they would have to weigh the pros and cons to see where they would make more money, whether it would be through fines and confiscated properties or more in taxes. I bet if it was legal more people would partake in smoking it and it may generated a lot of revenue.
Jam

Saltillo, MS

#6 Oct 6, 2010
Of course the Illinois Sheriff's Association wants to keep it illegal. Look how much money they're making. If it was legal they wouldn't be able to STEAL someone's property.
Hmmm

Saint Louis, MO

#7 Oct 6, 2010
Small amounts should be legal. It would cut out the profit of the dealers and stop some crimes, while increasing government revenues. It has already been proven to be medically beneficial. It is safer than alcohol & has ruined far fewer lives.

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#8 Oct 6, 2010
Here are some facts concerning the situation in Holland.--Please save a copy and use it as a reference when debating prohibitionists who claim the exact opposite concerning the facts as presented here below:

”Cannabis coffee shops" are not only restricted to the Capital of Holland, Amsterdam. They can be found in more than 50 cities and towns across the country. At present, only the retail sale of five grams is tolerated, so production remains criminalized. The mayors of a majority of the cities with coffeeshops have long urged the national government to also decriminalize the supply side.

A poll taken earlier this year indicated that some 50% of the Dutch population thinks cannabis should be fully legalized while only 25% wanted a complete ban. Even though 62% of the voters said they had never taken cannabis. An earlier poll also indicated 80% opposing coffee shop closures.
http://www.dutchnews.nl/news/archives/2010/02...

It is true that the number of coffee shops has fallen from its peak of around 2,500 throughout the country to around 700 now. The problems, if any, concern mostly “drug tourists” and are largely confined to cities and small towns near the borders with Germany and Belgium. These problems, mostly involve traffic jams, and are the result of cannabis prohibition in neighboring countries.“Public nuisance problems” with the coffee shops are minimal when compared with bars, as is demonstrated by the rarity of calls for the police for problems at coffee shops.

While it is true that lifetime and “past-month” use rates did increase back in the seventies and eighties, the critics shamefully fail to report that there were comparable and larger increases in cannabis use in most, if not all, neighboring countries which continued complete prohibition.

According to the World Health Organization only 19.8 percent of the Dutch have used marijuana, less than half the U.S. figure.
In Holland 9.7% of young adults (aged 15–24) consume soft drugs once a month, comparable to the level in Italy (10.9%) and Germany (9.9%) and less than in the UK (15.8%) and Spain (16.4%). Few transcend to becoming problem drug users (0.44%), well below the average (0.52%) of the compared countries.

The WHO survey of 17 countries finds that the United States has the highest usage rates for nearly all illegal substances.

In the U.S. 42.4 percent admitted having used marijuana. The only other nation that came close was New Zealand, another bastion of get-tough policies, at 41.9 percent. No one else was even close. The results for cocaine use were similar, with the U.S. again leading the world by a large margin.

Even more striking is what the researchers found when they asked young adults when they had started using marijuana. Again, the U.S. led the world, with 20.2 percent trying marijuana by age 15. No other country was even close, and in Holland, just 7 percent used marijuana by 15 -- roughly one-third of the U.S. figure.
thttp://www.alternet.org/drugs /90295/

In 1998, the US Drug Czar General Barry McCaffrey claimed that the U.S. had less than half the murder rate of the Netherlands.“That’s drugs,” he explained. The Dutch Central Bureau for Statistics immediately issued a special press release explaining that the actual Dutch murder rate is 1.8 per 100,000 people, or less than one-quarter the U.S. murder rate.

Here’s a very recent article by a psychiatrist from Amsterdam, exposing "Drug Czar misinformation"
http://tinyurl.com/247a8mp

Since: Sep 10

Location hidden

#9 Oct 6, 2010
Now let's look at a comparative analysis of the levels of cannabis use in two cities: Amsterdam and San Francisco, which was published in the American Journal of Public Health May 2004,

The San Francisco prevalence survey showed that 39.2% of the population had used cannabis. This is 3 times the prevalence found in the Amsterdam sample

Source: Craig Reinarman, Peter D.A. Cohen and Hendrien L. Kaal, "The Limited Relevance of Drug Policy"
http://www.mapinc.org/lib/limited.pdf

Moreover, 51% of people who had smoked cannabis in San Francisco reported that they were offered heroin, cocaine or amphetamine the last time they purchased cannabis. In contrast, only 15% of Amsterdam residents who had ingested marijuana reported the same conditions. Prohibition is the Gateway Policy that forces cannabis seekers to buy from criminals who gladly expose them to harder drugs.

The indicators of death, disease and corruption are even much better in the Netherlands than in Sweden for instance, a country praised by UNODC for its successful drug policy."

Here's Antonio Maria Costa doing his level best to avoid discussing the success of Dutch drug policy:
&fe ature=related

The Netherlands also provides heroin on prescription under tight regulation to about 1500 long-term heroin addicts for whom methadone maintenance treatment has failed.
http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/free-heroin...

The Dutch justice ministry announced, last year, the closure of eight prisons and cut 1,200 jobs in the prison system. A decline in crime has left many cells empty. There's simply not enough criminals
http://www.nrc.nl/international/article224682...

For further information, kindly check out this very informative FAQ provided by Radio Netherlands: http://www.rnw.nl/english/article/faq-soft-dr...
or go to this page: http://www.rnw.nl/english/dossier/Soft-drugs
brinstl

Chesterfield, MO

#10 Oct 6, 2010
The sheriff is absolutely correct in his assessment that criminalizing weed is no different than criminalizing alcohol during Prohibition some 85 years ago. It didn't work then and it doesn't work now!

I think it shows some courage for a top law enforcement official to come out and make a common sense argument. I think the social wrongs of the drug war have been perpetrated long enough! Incarcerating those with habits we find objectionable is a dirty business. I'm sure we would find much in the way of hypocrisy if we started evaluating the personal habits of our elected and law enforcement officials.
ktbu1964

Saint Louis, MO

#11 Oct 6, 2010
LEGALIZE IT!!!! It's a natural herb, and to be honest...I would rather be around stoned people than drunk obnoxious people.
LEGALIZE IT

Sweden

#12 Oct 6, 2010
@Issues. Why do you mock n*&&#$ when you so clearly act like one. Pot calling the kettle black? Get it? Pot. Black.
Common Science

Courtenay, Canada

#13 Oct 6, 2010
Speaking of black and white:

Our forefathers had the publics ears, minds and souls when marijuana was finally outlawed in 1937. Our focus must be reinvigorated as to the methods used to snap America out of its complacency within those wonderous moralistic years. Lets make a vow to be vigilant and fight back with all the facts available on the most powerful tool - the internet.

If you feel the sense of purpose to go to just one website for honest inspiration to end the inevitable senseless tragedies awaiting our family, friends, and foes alike, look no further than:
http://www.opposeprop19.com/

Please take this message to heart. We cant afford to let the $500 billion in hard-earned money the ONDCP spent on education during the former drug war, to go up in smoke.
Kimmie

Saint Louis, MO

#14 Oct 6, 2010
Common Science wrote:
Speaking of black and white:
Our forefathers had the publics ears, minds and souls when marijuana was finally outlawed in 1937. Our focus must be reinvigorated as to the methods used to snap America out of its complacency within those wonderous moralistic years. Lets make a vow to be vigilant and fight back with all the facts available on the most powerful tool - the internet.
If you feel the sense of purpose to go to just one website for honest inspiration to end the inevitable senseless tragedies awaiting our family, friends, and foes alike, look no further than:
http://www.opposeprop19.com/
Please take this message to heart. We cant afford to let the $500 billion in hard-earned money the ONDCP spent on education during the former drug war, to go up in smoke.


What A joke, I am not a pot smoker! But that crap on the link above made me want to HURL.
I quote
"Marijuana is the most violence- causing drug in the history of mankind "
"You smoke a joint you are likely to kill your brother"

No one in there right mind would believe you or the crap you are trying to sell!!!
MaineGeezer

Yarmouth, ME

#15 Oct 6, 2010
The sheriff (and others) may want to investigate the organization Law Enforcement Against Prohibition, an international organization of several thousand current and former law enforcement personnel calling for an end to drug prohibition. See their website http://www.copssaylegalizedrugs.com for details.

When one realizes he's doing something dumb, a sensible person will stop doing it. And drug prohibition is a dumb idea that we need to stop doing, just as we stopped prohibiting alcohol when we realized that prohibition was giving us a huge crime problem and even worse alcohol problems.

That's what drug prohibition is doing for us: giving us a huge crime problem and making our drug problems worse.
sixtyfps

Omaha, NE

#16 Oct 6, 2010
Kimmie wrote:
<quoted text>
What A joke, I am not a pot smoker! But that crap on the link above made me want to HURL.
I quote
"Marijuana is the most violence- causing drug in the history of mankind "
"You smoke a joint you are likely to kill your brother"
No one in there right mind would believe you or the crap you are trying to sell!!!
It's supposed to be funny, Kimmie. It's essentially repackaged Reefer Madness, put on display for the world to roll its eyes at. I think it's pretty effing brilliant.:)
MaineGeezer

Yarmouth, ME

#17 Oct 6, 2010
@Common Science:

You may want to read http://www.druglibrary.org/schaffer/History/w...
It's a transcript of a speech given by Prof. Charles Whitebreat of the USC Law School to a meeting of the California Judges Association in 1995. It explains how we got our marijuana laws, and it was not done in the way you seem to think it was.

I believe you underestimate the cost of the war on drugs by a factor of two: the estimates I've heard are more like a trillion dollars of wasted money. You seem to think that's a reason to keep going. I think it's a splendid reason to stop wasting so much money on a lost cause.
Kimmie

Saint Louis, MO

#18 Oct 6, 2010
sixtyfps wrote:
<quoted text>
It's supposed to be funny, Kimmie. It's essentially repackaged Reefer Madness, put on display for the world to roll its eyes at. I think it's pretty effing brilliant.:)
Ohh thank goodness.. At first I could not believe what I was reading.
Legalize it

Sycamore, IL

#19 Oct 6, 2010
brian

Saint Louis, MO

#20 Oct 6, 2010
what a poorly made specimen in the photo. wise up, man.

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