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1 - 8 of 8 Comments Last updated Nov 1, 2007
Skrenta

Berkeley, CA

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#1
Jan 27, 2006
 
Just posted "News 2.0 is not Journalism" over on the topix blog.

http://blog.topix.net/archives/000090.html
Bosko Milekic

New York, NY

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#2
Jan 27, 2006
 
Good post. Except that I'm not sure I agree with the assertion that News 2.0 or Web 2.0 or what-have-you are cutting out the middle-man. Look at memeorandum for a concrete example of this. The "seed" news items are almost always (primarily) paid reporter reports. Bloggers merely amplify/define the importance of the news source with additional commentary, often in the form of editorial (or thereabouts).

“CEO”

Since: Dec 05

San Francisco

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#3
Jan 27, 2006
 
Bosko Milekic wrote:
Good post. Except that I'm not sure I agree with the assertion that News 2.0 or Web 2.0 or what-have-you are cutting out the middle-man. Look at memeorandum for a concrete example of this. The "seed" news items are almost always (primarily) paid reporter reports. Bloggers merely amplify/define the importance of the news source with additional commentary, often in the form of editorial (or thereabouts).
That's definitely true of many sites that are harvesting article commentary -- with topix' forums, you're seeing first person accounts, not just comments about exiting sstories -- check out some of rich's examples..
Michael Tippett

Canada

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#4
Jan 27, 2006
 
Why the New News is Better

I think it's a mistake to begin with the idea that news is about the lone reporter. News is also about collaboration. Old school news organizations have many departments (including advertising) but even with content there are editors, reporters, photographers, videographers and others. Quality news happens when all these people work together and that is also true for the new news.

For new 2.0 to work all of these functions need to be in place: you need a mechanism for sorting out the good from the bad; you need the ability to write original stuff and post photos &videos; and you need the ability to seed, digg or otherwise get news into the public view. News is a team effort and that is what makes it interesting.

Once you see news as a collaborative effort that involves editors, reporters, photographers, fact checkers and others you start to see how CJ news can actually be better than the mainstream stuff.

More participants mean more manpower and the potential for better quality. Think about it - a newspaper that serves 250 readers will probably have about 10 inhouse photographers. There used to be a saying about never messing with someone who buys ink by the barrel. Well, don’t mess with a quarter million digital camera owners either - they might just get organized.

But the prospect of an audience revolt in the news business is not so remote. As with many other CJ experiments, we at NowPublic, already have more contributors in most North American cities than the local news organizations do. With those kinds of numbers the audience is already on the brink of control – they just don’t know it yet.

__________

Michael Tippett,
NowPublic.com

http://corp.nowpublic.com/...
Todd

Seoul, Korea

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#5
Jan 27, 2006
 
Ouch, you blew it right in the opening: revealing that you haven't read a heck of a lot of citizen journalism, labelling them first-person accounts. Sure, a lot are, but not all. Best go back to the drawingboard and give a better analysis.
Mike Orren

United States

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#6
Jan 27, 2006
 
Hey Rich:

Thanks for the positive review. I can't speak for the Barista gals, but although I'm not a fan of CJ as a term, it is our ideal-- both in terms of its genuine voice and, frankly, its low(er) cost in creating valuable content that might not otherwise see the light of a search engine.

But there has to be a seeding process, as you rightly note. So we use tools and we guide the creation of content. But most of the content on the site was created by a blogger/podcaster who was doing this anyway as a labor of love. Sure, she's stepped up the volume a bit since joining forces with us, but she's the same great blogger she was before. Is it still grassroots? I *think* so.

It's hard to say where all this News 2.0 stuff will go -- lord knows if you'd told me six months ago that I'd be the publisher of a local music site, I would've called you crazy.

But I see things developing in two parallel paths:

- The aggregation and filterng of content
- The creation and enabling of content that has a significant positive value but does not have sufficient value to bear the brunt of old-media cost structures.(The "long tail")

At Pegasus, we think that we're in both of those businesses, but err towards the second. The first may be more immediately profitable, but the second has more than a fighting chance -- and is rewarding as hell, especially when you get traffic and goodwill from covering the previously disenjournolized.

And yeah, it's probably a misnomer to call a detailed database of 600 local bands journalism, even though reporting and writing is involved.(This is a debate I've had with journos in my employ for years.) But it is information. And somebody wants it and wants to talk about it.

We're all blessed to live in interesting times.
rick

AOL

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#7
Jan 30, 2006
 
in the early '90s i was involved with local bulletin boards services (bbss)scattered all over the country that provided a very similar platform, only to a much smaller audience obviously. later, in '98, we did the same at aol's digital city where we had well over 300 city sites sustained primarily by member input. "can you believe bill at that school board meeting?" yeah, that kind of thing. it was exciting then, but almost more exciting now to see it being accepted as a phenomenon.
wow

Reno, NV

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#8
Nov 1, 2007
 
interesting

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