learnin

Alma, KS

#1 Aug 1, 2009
These are the words which Officer French spoke to Sergeant Paul Reichenbach when Reichenbach arrived at the Ramsey house.

French had been at the Ramsey house probably about five minutes or so. The Ramseys directed him to the spiral case in order to show him the ransom note. After reading, the Ramseys were giving him a brief synopis of the timeline when Reichenbach arrived. Taking Reichenbach aside, French told him it looked like a kidnapping but, "something's not right."

Was French basing his observation strictly on the unusual ransom note? Or was he basing it on the behavior of the Ramseys? Was it both?

Did he perceive that Patsy's grief was a poor acting performance or did John seem distant and cool?

Does anyone know of a French deposition that might explain his observation? After all, in the midst of what must have been a sudden slap in the face ( the quietness of Christmas having suddenly been interrupted by hysterics), French was able to make a keen observation within minutes of arriving at the crime scene.

Since: Mar 07

Wixom, MI

#2 Aug 1, 2009
You mean the same officer who searched the basement except for the cellar where the body was? Didn`t search in there because Fleet had already looked in there and locked it. Keen? No.

“If life gives you melons”

Since: Nov 06

You might be dyslexic

#3 Aug 2, 2009
Maybe it was the same officer French who was looking for exit points from the basement and seeing a door locked from the outside gave a correct indication that there was no egress from that room in the basement.

You can't get anything right can you Detroit? Fleet wasn't even there yet.
Nelly

AOL

#4 Aug 2, 2009
learnin wrote:
These are the words which Officer French spoke to Sergeant Paul Reichenbach when Reichenbach arrived at the Ramsey house.
French had been at the Ramsey house probably about five minutes or so. The Ramseys directed him to the spiral case in order to show him the ransom note. After reading, the Ramseys were giving him a brief synopis of the timeline when Reichenbach arrived. Taking Reichenbach aside, French told him it looked like a kidnapping but, "something's not right."
Was French basing his observation strictly on the unusual ransom note? Or was he basing it on the behavior of the Ramseys? Was it both?
Did he perceive that Patsy's grief was a poor acting performance or did John seem distant and cool?
Does anyone know of a French deposition that might explain his observation? After all, in the midst of what must have been a sudden slap in the face ( the quietness of Christmas having suddenly been interrupted by hysterics), French was able to make a keen observation within minutes of arriving at the crime scene.
Within the first week of this, I recall it being said that French observed Patsy watching him "thru splayed fingers" when he came up from the basement. Later it was reported that cops observed/reported Patsy in full mourning upon answering the door to them. Arndt reported that Patsy curled "into a fetal position" by the china cabinet for half the day.
One thing's for sure, nobody reported Patsy asked questions, paced, or took a pro active role to find her daughter. Distraught and praying and ready to go as soon as JR said 'jump'.
Man, I'd be all over my husband if I found a note like that addressed to him and my child gone. The cops would have to pull me away from him if he wouldn't answer my questions! That husband and wife are a strange couple if they don't ask eachother questions at a time like that.
FoolsGold

Cape Coral, FL

#5 Aug 2, 2009
At the time the statemnt was made I think there was insufficient basis to have assessed the parents reaction. I think the statement was based on the amount of the ransom.

It might interest all sleuths to know that when a few FBI agents in Denver were beeped to be "on standby for travel and extended duty hours" there was a similar discussion about something being wrong and none of those agents at either end of the telephone conversation had observed the Ramseys but they did know of the note and of its unusually and absurd amount.
learnin

Alma, KS

#6 Aug 2, 2009
Nelly wrote:
<quoted text>
Within the first week of this, I recall it being said that French observed Patsy watching him "thru splayed fingers" when he came up from the basement. Later it was reported that cops observed/reported Patsy in full mourning upon answering the door to them. Arndt reported that Patsy curled "into a fetal position" by the china cabinet for half the day.
One thing's for sure, nobody reported Patsy asked questions, paced, or took a pro active role to find her daughter. Distraught and praying and ready to go as soon as JR said 'jump'.
Man, I'd be all over my husband if I found a note like that addressed to him and my child gone. The cops would have to pull me away from him if he wouldn't answer my questions! That husband and wife are a strange couple if they don't ask eachother questions at a time like that.
Good points. From my first reading into those moments after the ransom note was "discovered", I thought Patsy's grief seemed a little more like mourning a death rather than being anxious over a kidnapping. And, like you say, if she thought the ransom note was valid, I would think she'd be grilling John constantly about his business ties, associations, etc.

While the ransom note would throw up red flags, in the first minutes, I believe French needed more than just the ransom note to believe something was not right about the scene. Just my opinion.
learnin

Alma, KS

#7 Aug 2, 2009
FoolsGold wrote:
At the time the statemnt was made I think there was insufficient basis to have assessed the parents reaction. I think the statement was based on the amount of the ransom.
It might interest all sleuths to know that when a few FBI agents in Denver were beeped to be "on standby for travel and extended duty hours" there was a similar discussion about something being wrong and none of those agents at either end of the telephone conversation had observed the Ramseys but they did know of the note and of its unusually and absurd amount.
Well, for sure, the ransom note would raise some eyebrows especially to FBI agents who would have been involved with several kidnappings I would think. But, French was just a patrolman if I'm not mistaken. Not saying that he wouldn't question the ransom note right away. Most people would. But, would you question that it was not a kidnapping from just the ransom note?

At any rate, this is why I asked if French gave a deposition so that his observations could be better known?

Since: Mar 07

United States

#8 Aug 2, 2009
Legal__Eagle wrote:
Maybe it was the same officer French who was looking for exit points from the basement and seeing a door locked from the outside gave a correct indication that there was no egress from that room in the basement.
You can't get anything right can you Detroit? Fleet wasn't even there yet.
YOU don`t know much about this case do you. Although French was the first officer there he didn`t look in the basement until later. Fleet admits to being there right after he arrived-sometim between 6:06 and 6:30. Fleet admits to having looked in the cellar but didn`t see Jonbenet`s body. But yet Fleet relocked the door to the cellar. WHY??? The sources all say that no search was done until some time after the police were there. Look at this from the Jonbenet Case Encyclopedia.
Why Didn't Fleet White Report a Chair Blocking Door? Internet poster Athena has pointed out that Fleet White, who had searched the basement that morning prior to John (6:06 AM), did not report this chair blocking the door even though he reported seeing the train room window. One possibility is that he simply forgot. A second is that to get into the train room, he may have moved the chair in front of the door leading to the wine cellar room. Since he also reports looking inside the wine cellar room that morning, he may have simply moved the chair back in front of train room door to unblock the door leading back to the wine cellar room, which was immediately adjacent (floor plan).
Why Didn't Officer French Report a Chair Blocking Door? Many believe that Officer French inspected the basement immediately on his arrival at the house around 5:59 AM (chronology). But according to Steve Thomas's account, French did not search basement until after 8:10 AM (chronology).

“If life gives you melons”

Since: Nov 06

You might be dyslexic

#9 Aug 3, 2009
DETROIT wrote:
<quoted text>YOU don`t know much about this case do you. Although French was the first officer there he didn`t look in the basement until later. Fleet admits to being there right after he arrived-sometim between 6:06 and 6:30. Fleet admits to having looked in the cellar but didn`t see Jonbenet`s body. But yet Fleet relocked the door to the cellar. WHY??? The sources all say that no search was done until some time after the police were there. Look at this from the Jonbenet Case Encyclopedia.
Why Didn't Fleet White Report a Chair Blocking Door? Internet poster Athena has pointed out that Fleet White, who had searched the basement that morning prior to John (6:06 AM), did not report this chair blocking the door even though he reported seeing the train room window. One possibility is that he simply forgot. A second is that to get into the train room, he may have moved the chair in front of the door leading to the wine cellar room. Since he also reports looking inside the wine cellar room that morning, he may have simply moved the chair back in front of train room door to unblock the door leading back to the wine cellar room, which was immediately adjacent (floor plan).
Why Didn't Officer French Report a Chair Blocking Door? Many believe that Officer French inspected the basement immediately on his arrival at the house around 5:59 AM (chronology). But according to Steve Thomas's account, French did not search basement until after 8:10 AM (chronology).
As always, you are wrong.
Richard French: The first BPD officer, along with Officer Karl Veitch, to respond to Patsy Ramsey's 911 call at 5:51 am December 26, 1996. They arrived at the home within minutes of the call. French searched the interior of the home, including the basement, for possible points of entry and egress. French testified before the Ramsey grand jury September 22, 1998.

Any further searches were after Arndt arrived when the home was searched again. Let this case go since you don't know anything about it, ok?
learnin

United States

#10 Aug 3, 2009
Legal__Eagle wrote:
<quoted text>
As always, you are wrong.
Richard French: The first BPD officer, along with Officer Karl Veitch, to respond to Patsy Ramsey's 911 call at 5:51 am December 26, 1996. They arrived at the home within minutes of the call. French searched the interior of the home, including the basement, for possible points of entry and egress. French testified before the Ramsey grand jury September 22, 1998.
So, Legal. The only testimony we have from French is to the GJ and we would have no transcript of that, right?
Any further searches were after Arndt arrived when the home was searched again. Let this case go since you don't know anything about it, ok?
So, Legal. The only statements we have from French is his testimony to the GJ? And the transcripts of that was never released, right?
Poopy Doo

Murfreesboro, TN

#11 Aug 3, 2009
I beg your humble pie.

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