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Since: Jan 10

New York, NY

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#1
Jan 29, 2010
 
I want to hear some opinions from biracial people.

i have known biracial people throughout my life and there are so many different opinions. some people feel connected to the black community, others don't, and some feel rejected by all sides. what is your specific experience and how do you think being biracial has affected your life?

and what is your racial background?

I try to be open minded about how biracial people feel as a black girl (cuz at the rate im going my kids might just be half white lol) but idk sometimes i feel like they purposely try to alienate themselves. like the owner of one of the natural black hair care lines my sister uses i think used to have a forum where she said she thought biracial people should be considered their own race. i think thats crazy. it just doesnt make sense. plus i have a tendency to see half black people as black first then biracial which is wrong i know but eh...

Since: Jan 10

New York, NY

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#2
Jan 29, 2010
 
sorry this includes all types of biracial people not just half black/half white people. :]
JJM

Palatka, FL

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#3
Apr 23, 2010
 
I have felt rejection on both sides. Thank goodness it has never been at the same place at once. Usually, there's one side that's way more hateful than the other and which side it is (if any throw me problems at all) seems to depend on what state I'm in. In one state I may find the majority of black people I encounter to be very friendly and the whites mostly racist, in another state I may find the majority of white people I encounter to be very friendly and it's the blacks that are mostly racist. In both cases I feel ripped apart. If it's white racism I'm usually have to listen to my black half get bashed like I'm not in the room because most white people don't realize I'm half black so they think they can talk freely. I don't take to that very well and they're likely to get a confrontation in which I point out they're bashing my father right in front of me. They're usually apologetic but it still irks the crap out of me and I'm not likely to associate with them again if I can help it. Meanwhile, with blacks the racism is usually more upfront because they usually recognize me as being biracial. Threats, up front discrimination, racial slurs, accusations, etc. My white mother has even gotten threatened by an employee while accompanying me to a store that was predominantly ran and patronized by black people.

That being said, I have found that there's good, non-racist people in all areas and in all racial groups. Of course I'm rejected by the racists because they don't like my other half but not every one is racist.

Still, I must say I do miss the close knit nature of the black community where I live. It's like a secret club I'm left out of because I'm not dark enough for them even though I'm part of the same family tree. Then they get mad at me for calling myself mixed instead of black, like I'm denying my heritage. Damn it, I'm not denying my heritage. My heritage denies me is more like it, LOL.

“Hi, I'm Deja!”

Since: Nov 09

Nice to meet you! ^_^

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#4
May 19, 2010
 

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Nope, however, my white side isn't as accepting of me.
Mil

United States

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#5
Mar 3, 2011
 

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Biracials being a separate race is not silly or stupid. You will never know our struggles unless you have walked 100 miles in our shoes. How would you feel being called White bitch by Black people constantly during high school? Black people are NOT as accepting to multiracial people as you all would like to lie and say.

Since: Apr 10

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#6
Mar 4, 2011
 

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I'm biracial (black and white).

Growing up in high school, I always felt accepted. I guess you could say I was popular, because I knew everyone and everyone knew me, and we were all friends.

I lived with my mother who was white, so growing up I mostly wanted to be called white and hung with white people most of the time.

I prefer white women over black women. It's always been my preference.

So, yes, I feel accepted by both races.
Anonymous

UK

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#7
Mar 7, 2011
 

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The "One Drop Rule" previously was used as a method to keep people who had Black heritage down. Once an individual was identified as having Black heritage, it was easy for white people to dismiss and subjugate them. But, today, in many cases, the "one drop rule" is used instead to convince Black people who have a white parent that they, in fact, are closer to "whiteness" and should therefore reject the notion of struggling to dismantle white supremacy.

This is a dangerous situation to me. While some people claim that the term "biracial" allows them to embrace the fullness of their heritage, I think, unfortunately, that white people often use it to keep Black people, who could otherwise be working together to end racism, stratified. It creates a sort of "buffer" zone between white and Black, which is used to convince people that racism/white supremacy is no longer an issue.

I find it extremely disconcerting when I hear white people who have children with a Black partner insist that their child is not Black, but is, in fact, "biracial". Their insistence upon the use of the term "biracial" indicates to me that they are not at all allies with Black people in the struggle to replace white supremacy with justice for all. The offhanded dismissal of the "Blackness" of their child leads their child to subconsciously identify more strongly with "whiteness", which is, let's face the facts, an easier existence.

The more white people can convince so called "biracial" people that they have a vested interest in being "part white" the more they can convince them to reject the cause of racial justice. It teaches so called "biracial" children that it is of ultimate importance to elevate and embrace "whiteness".
Anonymous

UK

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#8
Mar 7, 2011
 
heres the artical that was written by a very consious white women. i think.

http://www.thescavenger.net/feminism-a-pop-cu...

Since: Apr 10

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#9
Mar 7, 2011
 

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hurdlesANDhoops wrote:
The "One Drop Rule" previously was used as a method to keep people who had Black heritage down. Once an individual was identified as having Black heritage, it was easy for white people to dismiss and subjugate them. But, today, in many cases, the "one drop rule" is used instead to convince Black people who have a white parent that they, in fact, are closer to "whiteness" and should therefore reject the notion of struggling to dismantle white supremacy.
This is a dangerous situation to me. While some people claim that the term "biracial" allows them to embrace the fullness of their heritage, I think, unfortunately, that white people often use it to keep Black people, who could otherwise be working together to end racism, stratified. It creates a sort of "buffer" zone between white and Black, which is used to convince people that racism/white supremacy is no longer an issue.
I find it extremely disconcerting when I hear white people who have children with a Black partner insist that their child is not Black, but is, in fact, "biracial". Their insistence upon the use of the term "biracial" indicates to me that they are not at all allies with Black people in the struggle to replace white supremacy with justice for all. The offhanded dismissal of the "Blackness" of their child leads their child to subconsciously identify more strongly with "whiteness", which is, let's face the facts, an easier existence.
The more white people can convince so called "biracial" people that they have a vested interest in being "part white" the more they can convince them to reject the cause of racial justice. It teaches so called "biracial" children that it is of ultimate importance to elevate and embrace "whiteness".
No, biracial is a whole different thing than being black or white.

You're not either black or white, you are both.

Sure you may feel connected to one side more than the other. It depends on how and who you were raised by.
3rdgen mulatto

Memphis, TN

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#10
Mar 23, 2011
 
Some of you people need to do more reaserch on the black american race, black americans are by no meens fully african, I was whatching a documentary of famous black americans called african american lives, they did dna tests on all of them and most of them were 20%-50% white, even the darkskinned ones had aleast 25% white blood,

My point is I don't really see biracials as being different from other black americans becase the black american race is ALREADY a mixed race, I'm not a fan of the one drop rule but if black americans are already mixed then biracials arent that different.

I come from a generationally mixed family, I know my mixed race history, the slave plantation that my family came from had africans and cherokee native americans mixed together enslaved together, also I have white blood coming from my mother and father, and when I was born the doctor's thought I was half whit because I was so lightskinned
Nomoretears

Columbia, MD

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#11
Mar 27, 2011
 
3rdgen mulatto wrote:
Some of you people need to do more reaserch on the black american race, black americans are by no meens fully african, I was whatching a documentary of famous black americans called african american lives, they did dna tests on all of them and most of them were 20%-50% white, even the darkskinned ones had aleast 25% white blood,
My point is I don't really see biracials as being different from other black americans becase the black american race is ALREADY a mixed race, I'm not a fan of the one drop rule but if black americans are already mixed then biracials arent that different.
I come from a generationally mixed family, I know my mixed race history, the slave plantation that my family came from had africans and cherokee native americans mixed together enslaved together, also I have white blood coming from my mother and father, and when I was born the doctor's thought I was half whit because I was so lightskinned
So very true... However, it is good to know ones roots.
Nomoretears

Columbia, MD

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#12
Mar 27, 2011
 
Rejecting someone for the shade of skin is painful. I have experienced it. I am Irish/Scottish/with a little American Indian.

The confusion is I was never told about the Indian in me. Seems my mother wanted to get away from that part of her. So I found out through relatives at age thirty.

I have always experienced odd behavior from both sides... I understand the power play and took it on the chin. However, it still hurts. People think you are rejecting them if you call yourself something different. I can honestly say I feel no more one than the other and love all people of this world.
Nomoretears

Columbia, MD

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#13
Mar 27, 2011
 

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I am sad about the hate some people have for others just because of skin shade and racial make up. It is so very sad. Just suppose... God is actually part of every shade of people on earth, every race. Which part of God will you reject?
alien girl

Brooklyn, NY

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#15
Jul 19, 2011
 

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I must say, I've always felt rejected...my mother is black and my father is Korean...I love my father, n the few Korean relatives I've met years ago...but daddy left when I was 5...I was raised in my mothers family and grew up in a neighborhood with all of maybe 4 1/2 nonblack students in the entire district...so black was all I've ever known...I'm 20, and even now, my black family has shown me the most rejection and caused the worst pain relating to my race than anyone, anywhere...from calling me "rice-a-saurus" as a toddler, to telling me I cant be expected to be normal because that other part of me can control my thoughts sometimes...that I like different music because I'm mixed...they've blamed me for EVERYTHING...and it always points back to me being biracial, as if that somehow made me evil...I've never looked down on anyone all black, in actuality I used to cry night after night cuz I couldn't be like them....but because I'm mixed, I'm always treated like an outsider and met with hostility because I'm EXPECTED to be snooty, or stuck up...I'm neither...I spent all of my childhood and teenage years feeling guilty for messing up my family by being mixed, and tryin to make it up...from 4.0 report cards, to state championships in track, to college scholarships, deanslist, moving out early, working multiple jobs, buying my own cars/clothes, NOTHING I do has ever been good enough...and today actually, I gave up...because no matter what, ill never be accepted, and while that hurts, beating myself up to please them is stupid...I could go on for days cuz I haven't even mentioned my korean grandmother and how "dark" I'm getting..(I'm actually LIGHTskinned, and my Asian side is pretty apparent...being biracial has definitely affected my life, and while there are some perks every now and then, the bad has DEFINITELY been more obvious than the good....its hard...and a biracial child needs to be loved and protected, not isolated, and belittled....
shelby

Long Beach, CA

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#16
Jul 23, 2011
 
i've feel i dont belong on either. on my white part of the family i'm known as the "black girl" therefore i feel i'm expected to be and act a certain way so i could really just fit in. and on my black side i'm not considered black because i'm mixed, and i really want to be apart of my own culture but it's really frustrating when your put in a situation like this.
ForwardThinker

Ashburn, GA

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#17
Aug 13, 2011
 
shelby wrote:
i've feel i dont belong on either. on my white part of the family i'm known as the "black girl" therefore i feel i'm expected to be and act a certain way so i could really just fit in. and on my black side i'm not considered black because i'm mixed, and i really want to be apart of my own culture but it's really frustrating when your put in a situation like this.
Just be yourself! Everyone is an INDIVIDUAL! You can be an example to people that we don't have to be in one "group" (race) or another. If people want to refer to you as whatever, just let them do so. But you know that you are an individual, and that is all that matters. Be proud of being mixed race!

“Topix men Dreamgirl ”

Since: Aug 10

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#18
Sep 6, 2011
 

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Please I don't seek validation from anyone... I connect more so with my black side but I value my european blood as well. The only rejection I ever experience is on Topix and that does not make me or break me. People try to say you are of that of your father. But they fail to realize your mother was also a benefactor in contributing to your existence. Men do not qualify as who you are mothers do. Mothers are the main builders in building a cultural foundation for their kids. So quite frankly I'm fine with being classified as black when I'm not on here. I have no problem being biracial hell if I was whiter looking I'd probably be called a wigger because I will empathize with my black side more so... It is what it is...
zevvict

Clementon, NJ

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#19
Nov 15, 2011
 
alien girl wrote:
I must say, I've always felt rejected...my mother is black and my father is Korean...I love my father, n the few Korean relatives I've met years ago...but daddy left when I was 5...I was raised in my mothers family and grew up in a neighborhood with all of maybe 4 1/2 nonblack students in the entire district...so black was all I've ever known...I'm 20, and even now, my black family has shown me the most rejection and caused the worst pain relating to my race than anyone, anywhere...from calling me "rice-a-saurus" as a toddler, to telling me I cant be expected to be normal because that other part of me can control my thoughts sometimes...that I like different music because I'm mixed...they've blamed me for EVERYTHING...and it always points back to me being biracial, as if that somehow made me evil...I've never looked down on anyone all black, in actuality I used to cry night after night cuz I couldn't be like them....but because I'm mixed, I'm always treated like an outsider and met with hostility because I'm EXPECTED to be snooty, or stuck up...I'm neither...I spent all of my childhood and teenage years feeling guilty for messing up my family by being mixed, and tryin to make it up...from 4.0 report cards, to state championships in track, to college scholarships, deanslist, moving out early, working multiple jobs, buying my own cars/clothes, NOTHING I do has ever been good enough...and today actually, I gave up...because no matter what, ill never be accepted, and while that hurts, beating myself up to please them is stupid...I could go on for days cuz I haven't even mentioned my korean grandmother and how "dark" I'm getting..(I'm actually LIGHTskinned, and my Asian side is pretty apparent...being biracial has definitely affected my life, and while there are some perks every now and then, the bad has DEFINITELY been more obvious than the good....its hard...and a biracial child needs to be loved and protected, not isolated, and belittled....
you are sure it is because of race?! I don't believe it is.. could be like just for no reason..

my step grandfather was half asian and it was apparent.. and like.. i'm thinking about what your saying..

i'm like wtf are you talking about..
zevvict

Clementon, NJ

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#20
Nov 15, 2011
 
yea I really don't think that any of that has to do with your race at all because.. like.. most blacks are mixed..

what are your black family all pure or something??
zevvict

Clementon, NJ

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#21
Nov 15, 2011
 
cultures are not supposed to be racial.. they are regional..

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