Hemingway's Home ... Longtime dwelling in Cuban village famous writer's island in the stream

Apr 14, 2008 Full story: The Post and Courier 26

This monument to Hemingway in the village of Cojimar, outside of Havana, was built by fishermen. via The Post and Courier

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“FREEDOM, TRUTH& JUSTICE!”

Since: Sep 07

Whereever Freedom Dwells !

#1 Apr 14, 2008
A nice article. Very soon, Cuba will be free & we ALL will be able to go see this.

“FREEDOM, TRUTH& JUSTICE!”

Since: Sep 07

Whereever Freedom Dwells !

#2 Apr 14, 2008
I'll meet there, at the Floridita, all our good forum members and we will have some drinks, mojitos & frozen daiquiris. Hopefully they make good fritas there once Cuba is free!

“America la bella!!”

Since: Jan 07

que Dios te bendiga

#3 Apr 14, 2008
Brian Hicks just came from Cuba and I really followed all his articles about the Island he just visited. About Hemingway.. It is really very good article. In those years before 1959(Heming...) could walk all over Havana without fear and felt secure..People will aproach him for a handshake or a.. Ola!!...and he always smile..he wanted to be close to cubans on a everyday basis...he loved cuban people and Cuba....

“Amicus humani generis ”

Since: Apr 07

planet Earth

#4 Apr 14, 2008
Oh you naive and silly little simpletons. Hemingway was enthusiastic about Castro and the Revolution:

Ernest Hemingway's Secretary Interviewed in Cuba
"Ernest Loved Cuba and admired Fidel Castro. He always thought of returning to the island."

[...]
ACN: He was recalling in that article that during one of his visits to Cuba, as he was touring some places with President Fidel Castro in Havana, when he was going to sit in Fidel's car, the first thing he saw was a book by Hemingway. Can you recall any phrase any memory dealing with the relationship that existed between Fidel and Ernest?

Valerie: Well, I know Hemingway did admire Fidel Castro when he came. I remember I met him the year after Ernest died. He was very learned. Castro was humble when he met Ernest. He was the president of this country, but he behaved with Ernest as if Ernest was the greater man. He showed great admiration for Hemingway and Hemingway returned that complement. Because, and that's another thing I learned from him, it doesn't matter what you do if you do it well and Castro was doing very well. And Hemingway knew he was doing well. Hemingway admired Castro because he knew Castro was doing such a fair job in the Revolution and turning this country around.
[...]

Read the whole interview here:

http://www.radiohc.cu/ingles/especiales/marzo...
Santiago

Cape Coral, FL

#5 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
Oh you naive and silly little simpletons. Hemingway was enthusiastic about Castro and the Revolution:
Ernest Hemingway's Secretary Interviewed in Cuba
"Ernest Loved Cuba and admired Fidel Castro. He always thought of returning to the island."
[...]
ACN: He was recalling in that article that during one of his visits to Cuba, as he was touring some places with President Fidel Castro in Havana, when he was going to sit in Fidel's car, the first thing he saw was a book by Hemingway. Can you recall any phrase any memory dealing with the relationship that existed between Fidel and Ernest?
Valerie: Well, I know Hemingway did admire Fidel Castro when he came. I remember I met him the year after Ernest died. He was very learned. Castro was humble when he met Ernest. He was the president of this country, but he behaved with Ernest as if Ernest was the greater man. He showed great admiration for Hemingway and Hemingway returned that complement. Because, and that's another thing I learned from him, it doesn't matter what you do if you do it well and Castro was doing very well. And Hemingway knew he was doing well. Hemingway admired Castro because he knew Castro was doing such a fair job in the Revolution and turning this country around.
[...]
Read the whole interview here:
http://www.radiohc.cu/ingles/especiales/marzo...
Not only Hemingway was entusiastic about Castro........the whole world WAS..... He run out Batista who was a Dictator and at the beginig of the revolution he say that he was not a comunist and hpinotized the whole world about his intentions.......But what happen after?.......He become comunist , stablish a Dictatorhip and an one party only rule with only one absolutely chief...HIM and destroyed the country, holding the power imposing his will for almost half a century.

“Amicus humani generis ”

Since: Apr 07

planet Earth

#6 Apr 14, 2008
Santiago wrote:
<quoted text>
Not only Hemingway was entusiastic about Castro........the whole world WAS..... He run out Batista who was a Dictator and at the beginig of the revolution he say that he was not a comunist and hpinotized the whole world about his intentions.......But what happen after?.......He become comunist , stablish a Dictatorhip and an one party only rule with only one absolutely chief...HIM and destroyed the country, holding the power imposing his will for almost half a century.
Santiago, please be honest:

Do you want your fellow Cubans on the island to starve to death, become homeless and sleep on sidewalks and under bridges, become sick without health care, not to receive any education and become unemployed?

“America la bella!!”

Since: Jan 07

que Dios te bendiga

#7 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
Oh you naive and silly little simpletons. Hemingway was enthusiastic about Castro and the Revolution:
Ernest Hemingway's Secretary Interviewed in Cuba
"Ernest Loved Cuba and admired Fidel Castro. He always thought of returning to the island."
[...]
ACN: He was recalling in that article that during one of his visits to Cuba, as he was touring some places with President Fidel Castro in Havana, when he was going to sit in Fidel's car, the first thing he saw was a book by Hemingway. Can you recall any phrase any memory dealing with the relationship that existed between Fidel and Ernest?
Valerie: Well, I know Hemingway did admire Fidel Castro when he came. I remember I met him the year after Ernest died. He was very learned. Castro was humble when he met Ernest. He was the president of this country, but he behaved with Ernest as if Ernest was the greater man. He showed great admiration for Hemingway and Hemingway returned that complement. Because, and that's another thing I learned from him, it doesn't matter what you do if you do it well and Castro was doing very well. And Hemingway knew he was doing well. Hemingway admired Castro because he knew Castro was doing such a fair job in the Revolution and turning this country around.
[...]
Read the whole interview here:
http://www.radiohc.cu/ingles/especiales/marzo...
He was an admired of Fidel Castro for only the first year of the Revolution and it cost him that many people inside Cuba named him a Pink- Communist... The real issue is just as early as 1960 He left Cuba for sure... He knew something was going sour for the cubans... after lived in Cuba for almost 30 years..He had to say "good bye" to the Man he did admired in 1959 and to his beloved CUBA. Intelectual and writers do not get involved in Politics, but eat and drink with many dictators around the world. Life is political to me. Not for many like E. Hemingway

“America la bella!!”

Since: Jan 07

que Dios te bendiga

#8 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
<quoted text>
Santiago, please be honest:
Do you want your fellow Cubans on the island to starve to death, become homeless and sleep on sidewalks and under bridges, become sick without health care, not to receive any education and become unemployed?
You live in Germany and you are a cuban...TODAy cubans are starving to death..sleep on sidewalks see documental "El fangito" do not have enough doctors(all send to different countries for dollars to Castro) have no Medicine....education is only for Communnit Party Youth.... and unemployed???...you can say they are making only $13.00 dollars a month..enough to buy 3 pounds of coffee and milk....Be real.. why don't you move to Cuba??
Santiago

Cape Coral, FL

#9 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
<quoted text>
Santiago, please be honest:
Do you want your fellow Cubans on the island to starve to death, become homeless and sleep on sidewalks and under bridges, become sick without health care, not to receive any education and become unemployed?
There is no reason for me not to be Honest.NO as a cuban I don`t want that to happen that is why I want Castro and his system OUT OF CUBA.
Now let me ask you something and be honest.
As a non-cuban do you want Castro and his Dictatorship to continue distroying Cuba?, do you want Cubans to have one only party system with jail or exile for those that have a diferent point of view? Do you want that cuban remain to be prohibited to travel or have a freedom of speach? I has answer your question will you answer my?
Lcubano

United States

#10 Apr 14, 2008
Santiago wrote:
<quoted text>
There is no reason for me not to be Honest.NO as a cuban I don`t want that to happen that is why I want Castro and his system OUT OF CUBA.
Now let me ask you something and be honest.
As a non-cuban do you want Castro and his Dictatorship to continue distroying Cuba?, do you want Cubans to have one only party system with jail or exile for those that have a diferent point of view? Do you want that cuban remain to be prohibited to travel or have a freedom of speach? I has answer your question will you answer my?
there will be NO poor people in the new cuba.anything is a step up from what they have now.

“Amicus humani generis ”

Since: Apr 07

planet Earth

#11 Apr 14, 2008
Marie in Miami Fl wrote:
<quoted text>He was an admired of Fidel Castro for only the first year of the Revolution and it cost him that many people inside Cuba named him a Pink- Communist... The real issue is just as early as 1960 He left Cuba for sure... He knew something was going sour for the cubans... after lived in Cuba for almost 30 years..He had to say "good bye" to the Man he did admired in 1959 and to his beloved CUBA. Intelectual and writers do not get involved in Politics, but eat and drink with many dictators around the world. Life is political to me. Not for many like E. Hemingway
Big Butt Marie: As you were merely an uneducated peasant girl when you left Cuba half a century ago, how are you supposed to be able to comprehend the revolutionary achievements in that country since then? Have you at least visited Cuba in the mean time? You obviously don't have a clue as to how significantly Castro and his government raised the living standard of the Cuban people since 1959.

“Amicus humani generis ”

Since: Apr 07

planet Earth

#12 Apr 14, 2008
Santiago wrote:
<quoted text>
There is no reason for me not to be Honest.NO as a cuban I don`t want that to happen
Then you must support Castro and the Cuban government because it is the Revolution which has enabled everyone on the island to live in dignity:
Everybody has food, housing, free health care, free education and a job.
Santiago wrote:
<quoted text>Now let me ask you something and be honest.
As a non-cuban do you want Castro and his Dictatorship to continue distroying Cuba?, do you want Cubans to have one only party system with jail or exile for those that have a diferent point of view? Do you want that cuban remain to be prohibited to travel or have a freedom of speach? I has answer your question will you answer my?
I'm quite happy to answer your question, Santiago:
There is no such thing as a dictatorship in Cuba, but rather there exists the most advanced democratic system in the world, namely Direct Democracy. The Cuban people consider Fidel to be their ueber-father and guarantor of the Revolution. They're doing everything they can in order to protect Castro and his government, because for the first time in history they've been able to live in dignity and freedom.

“Amicus humani generis ”

Since: Apr 07

planet Earth

#13 Apr 14, 2008
Lcubano wrote:
<quoted text>there will be NO poor people in the new cuba.anything is a step up from what they have now.
Just like in Haiti, right.
Lcubano

Corpus Christi, TX

#14 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
<quoted text>
Big Butt Marie: As you were merely an uneducated peasant girl when you left Cuba half a century ago, how are you supposed to be able to comprehend the revolutionary achievements in that country since then? Have you at least visited Cuba in the mean time? You obviously don't have a clue as to how significantly Castro and his government raised the living standard of the Cuban people since 1959.
may i suggest you look at some documentaries available on you tube.

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

San Juan,Puerto Rico

#15 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
Oh you naive and silly little simpletons. Hemingway was enthusiastic about Castro and the Revolution:
Ernest Hemingway's Secretary Interviewed in Cuba
"Ernest Loved Cuba and admired Fidel Castro. He always thought of returning to the island."
[...]
ACN: He was recalling in that article that during one of his visits to Cuba, as he was touring some places with President Fidel Castro in Havana, when he was going to sit in Fidel's car, the first thing he saw was a book by Hemingway. Can you recall any phrase any memory dealing with the relationship that existed between Fidel and Ernest?
Valerie: Well, I know Hemingway did admire Fidel Castro when he came. I remember I met him the year after Ernest died. He was very learned. Castro was humble when he met Ernest. He was the president of this country, but he behaved with Ernest as if Ernest was the greater man. He showed great admiration for Hemingway and Hemingway returned that complement. Because, and that's another thing I learned from him, it doesn't matter what you do if you do it well and Castro was doing very well. And Hemingway knew he was doing well. Hemingway admired Castro because he knew Castro was doing such a fair job in the Revolution and turning this country around.
[...]
Read the whole interview here:
http://www.radiohc.cu/ingles/especiales/marzo...
PIG YOU ARE FUNNY!
"Castro was humble" HE!,HE!,HE!
IF ERNEST LIKE CASTRO SO MUCH WHY DID HE ONLY MET CASTRO JUST ONCE?.AND IT EVEN WASN'T PROGRAMMED.HEMIGHWAY HAPPENS TO BE WATHCHING THE 'VARADERO REGATAS' AND CASTRO WAS THERE TOO.THEY MET FOR LESS THAN 20 MINUTES AND NOT EVEN ONCE MORE TIME DID HEMIGHWAY SHOWED ANY INTEREST IN MEETING CASTRO AGAIN.DO YOU DARE TO DENY THAT THEY MET ONLY ONCE..MY DEAR PIG?

“America la bella!!”

Since: Jan 07

que Dios te bendiga

#16 Apr 14, 2008
Observandum wrote:
<quoted text>
Big Butt Marie: As you were merely an uneducated peasant girl when you left Cuba half a century ago, how are you supposed to be able to comprehend the revolutionary achievements in that country since then? Have you at least visited Cuba in the mean time? You obviously don't have a clue as to how significantly Castro and his government raised the living standard of the Cuban people since 1959.
My husband(italian) have been to Cuba many times as well as my family and I have family in Cuba...But what about you??If you are going to judge by that you are not even cuban....But ObserVadummies!! I am not going to discuss with you the real Cuba of Castro..you are blind and want to be blind. Lets just keep joking here at Topix.

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

San Juan,Puerto Rico

#17 Apr 14, 2008
Marie in Miami Fl wrote:
<quoted text>He was an admired of Fidel Castro for only the first year of the Revolution and it cost him that many people inside Cuba named him a Pink- Communist... The real issue is just as early as 1960 He left Cuba for sure... He knew something was going sour for the cubans... after lived in Cuba for almost 30 years..He had to say "good bye" to the Man he did admired in 1959 and to his beloved CUBA. Intelectual and writers do not get involved in Politics, but eat and drink with many dictators around the world. Life is political to me. Not for many like E. Hemingway
Mary'our' pedophile pig' is lying again.Hemingway met Castro just once at sail fish fishing competition at 'The Miramar Yatch Club' on May 12 1960!Two months later Hemingway left Cuba for good!!Never did Hemingway did show any interest before(Althought he was living in Cuba) or met Castro again)!Once again I ask Observandumb!Obsevandumb do you deny that?

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

San Juan,Puerto Rico

#18 Apr 14, 2008

(CBS) Can you delve into the life and times of Ernest Hemingway without mentioning Fidel Castro? CBS News Sunday Morning Anchor Charles Osgood found some characteristics the two men had in common, as well as a moment in history .

Fidel Castro and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most identifiable figures of the 20th century. Here in Cuba, their images are not hard to find, far smaller than life in some cases. The stories of the two men themselves remain larger than life.

Fidel Castro: the young revolutionary who gathered his rebels in the hills to challenge and ultimately overthrow the corrupt dictator Fulgencio Battista. Now, 40 years later, still in power, still calling the shots. Every schoolchild in Cuba knows what Fidel Castro looks like.

And believe it or not, every Cuban schoolchild knows what Ernest Hemingway looked like, too. In fact, the Cuban schools run an annual competition for the best likeness of the man the kids know as "the great adventurer."

Hemingway was attracted to danger. To "man vs. lion" in the jungle, "man vs. marlin" at sea, "man vs. bull" in the bullring, and especially "man vs. man" in war.

In World War I, Hemingway volunteered as an ambulance driver and was severely injured.


Hemingway, after being injured in WWI (Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park)
When Francisco Franco's fascists warred against the Republican government in Spain, Hemingway went to report and record the battle. And there he was again as a correspondent in World War II.

Yet a decade later when he was living in Cuba, a revolution was going on, and Hemingway did not seek out Castro in the hills or chronicle the war in his own backyard.

Only once did the two men meet, an occasion captured in a photograph taken by Osvaldo Salas.

What happened was that in 1960, the year after Castro had come to power, Hemingway asked Fidel to be a part of his annual marlin-fishing contest.

Says Roberto Salas, Osvaldo's son and also a photographer, "Hemingway had invited Castro to be a judge." But Castro wanted to compete. And there he is in a photograph taken by Osvaldo, fishing with Che Guavera. Che's nose was in a book when Osvaldo Salas took the picture.

And when the contest was over, guess who had landed the biggest marlin? Says Salas, "It just so happened that Castro landed the biggest marlin. It just so happened that Castro won."

As the throng surged around them, Roberto's father elbowed his way through the crowd and pointed his camera and snapped the picture the world remembers.

It was, Salas says, "the only time they ever met."

It was not exactly a private meeting, he explans. "I don't think they could have had too much of a private conversation, because that shows you the maul of people that were all around them," he says.

People often wonder what it was that Papa was whispering in Fidel's ear. Was it about politics? Literature? Could it have been fish?

Salas replies, "It could have been fish."

“CUBA Y PUERTO RICO HERMANOS”

Since: Dec 06

San Juan,Puerto Rico

#19 Apr 14, 2008

(CBS) Can you delve into the life and times of Ernest Hemingway without mentioning Fidel Castro? CBS News Sunday Morning Anchor Charles Osgood found some characteristics the two men had in common, as well as a moment in history they shared

Fidel Castro and Ernest Hemingway are two of the most identifiable figures of the 20th century. Here in Cuba, their images are not hard to find, far smaller than life in some cases. The stories of the two men themselves remain larger than life.

Fidel Castro: the young revolutionary who gathered his rebels in the hills to challenge and ultimately overthrow the corrupt dictator Fulgencio Battista. Now, 40 years later, still in power, still calling the shots. Every schoolchild in Cuba knows what Fidel Castro looks like.

And believe it or not, every Cuban schoolchild knows what Ernest Hemingway looked like, too. In fact, the Cuban schools run an annual competition for the best likeness of the man the kids know as "the great adventurer."

Hemingway was attracted to danger. To "man vs. lion" in the jungle, "man vs. marlin" at sea, "man vs. bull" in the bullring, and especially "man vs. man" in war.

In World War I, Hemingway volunteered as an ambulance driver and was severely injured.


Hemingway, after being injured in WWI (Ernest Hemingway Foundation of Oak Park)
When Francisco Franco's fascists warred against the Republican government in Spain, Hemingway went to report and record the battle. And there he was again as a correspondent in World War II.

Yet a decade later when he was living in Cuba, a revolution was going on, and Hemingway did not seek out Castro in the hills or chronicle the war in his own backyard.

Only once did the two men meet, an occasion captured in a photograph taken by Osvaldo Salas.

What happened was that in 1960, the year after Castro had come to power, Hemingway asked Fidel to be a part of his annual marlin-fishing contest.

Says Roberto Salas, Osvaldo's son and also a photographer, "Hemingway had invited Castro to be a judge." But Castro wanted to compete. And there he is in a photograph taken by Osvaldo, fishing with Che Guavera. Che's nose was in a book when Osvaldo Salas took the picture.

And when the contest was over, guess who had landed the biggest marlin? Says Salas, "It just so happened that Castro landed the biggest marlin. It just so happened that Castro won."

As the throng surged around them, Roberto's father elbowed his way through the crowd and pointed his camera and snapped the picture the world remembers.

It was, Salas says, "the only time they ever met."

It was not exactly a private meeting, he explans. "I don't think they could have had too much of a private conversation, because that shows you the maul of people that were all around them," he says.

People often wonder what it was that Papa was whispering in Fidel's ear. Was it about politics? Literature? Could it have been fish?

Salas replies, "It could have been fish."

Since: Apr 08

Los Angeles, CA

#20 Apr 14, 2008
gracias wjdc.

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