Once slow-moving threat, global warming speeds up, leaving litt...

Full story: Newsday

When Bill Clinton took office in 1993, global warming was a slow-moving environmental problem that was easy to ignore.

Comments (Page 1,492)

Showing posts 29,821 - 29,840 of45,761
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31507
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

3

3

3

fishaholic wrote:
<quoted text>
Seems to have worked for you AGWers.
You seem very fishy.

How about learning about AGW from the scientists!
Teddy R

North Vancouver, Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31508
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
Thought for today.
A year ago crude oil was around $97 a bbl. Today it is $86.
A year ago in my town, gasoline sold for $3.38. Today it is at $3.40. Why?
Crude - reflects worldwide eoonomic slowdown, especially China, while at same time Saudis earlier this year upped production targets?

Gasoline - reflects fact that refineries are aging & being shut down in the US, and not being replaced by new refineries? Ergo domestic gasoline production falling in the face of stable or modestly increasing demand?

I'm just guessing based on anecdotal info - I don't really follow energy markets very closely - but what the hey.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31509
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

SpaceBlues wrote:
<quoted text>You seem very fishy.
How about learning about AGW from the scientists!
I would if there was such a thing and I could find one not on a gummint grant that's afraid of losing the utter on his cash cow.

BTW, you should take your own advice.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31510
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

Teddy R wrote:
<quoted text>
Now, now - be fair.
Evidence of extreme climatic or weather excursions that don't fit the AGW narrative can also be handily disposed of by dismissing them as reflecting only "local or regional" phenomena, not global.
You've got to get up pretty early in the afternoon to put anything over on these guys ...
You do have a point. I especially like the way bozo follows this reasoning almost to the letter. "It's more frequent due to AGW, not arguing that weather will be extreme from time to time." Yet, every time ANYTHING extreme happens, the first word out of chicken little's mouth is "IT'S DUE TO AGW"!!! I'm sure the western wildfires were caused by AGW.

Since: Nov 08

Location hidden

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31511
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
Thought for today.
A year ago crude oil was around $97 a bbl. Today it is $86.
A year ago in my town, gasoline sold for $3.38. Today it is at $3.40. Why?
It's due to AGW.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain hideaway, SE Spain

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31512
Jul 13, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

kristy wrote:
Now you are saying extreme weather will become more frequent when you just posted above that storms would become less frequent but more energetic. Which is it? Show me the scientific proof. More frequent compared to when...the 1960s?
You'll have to excuse grandpaw, he probably meant to say that extreme weather is reported more often in this modern age of high speed digital communications.

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31513
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

1

kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
Now you are saying extreme weather will become more frequent when you just posted above that storms would become less frequent but more energetic. Which is it? Show me the scientific proof. More frequent compared to when...the 1960s?
Sorry you are so dense. Weather events also include heat records, lack of rain as well as storms.

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31514
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

Teddy R wrote:
<quoted text>
Crude - reflects worldwide eoonomic slowdown, especially China, while at same time Saudis earlier this year upped production targets?
Gasoline - reflects fact that refineries are aging & being shut down in the US, and not being replaced by new refineries? Ergo domestic gasoline production falling in the face of stable or modestly increasing demand?
I'm just guessing based on anecdotal info - I don't really follow energy markets very closely - but what the hey.
That is poo poo. The refining capacity in the US has increased as refineries are enlarged and modernized. As a matter of fact, the US is exporting refined products at an increasing rate. Domestic production is not falling, it is increasing. As a matter of fact gasoline exports are at a record high.
http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler....
Teddy R

Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31515
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
That is poo poo. The refining capacity in the US has increased as refineries are enlarged and modernized. As a matter of fact, the US is exporting refined products at an increasing rate. Domestic production is not falling, it is increasing. As a matter of fact gasoline exports are at a record high.
http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler....
Thanks for linking data.

The gasoline export data is interesting - gasoline exports more than doubling since 2009. I hadn't realized it was that sharp an increase - not surprising, though when one considers demand in China as they move towards a two-cars-in-every-garage future.

At the same time, US domestic gasoline production has remained essentially flat since 2009:

http://www.eia.gov/dnav/pet/hist/LeafHandler....

Net result - relatively less gasoline available for the domestic retail market. While demand is no doubt soft due to the slowest recovery from recession in US history, this would tend to keep retail prices up, which is what I was speculating.

What's your theory?
Teddy R

Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31516
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

2

1

1

Then there's this:

http://205.254.135.7/dnav/pet/ hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET &s=MOCLEUS2&f=M

US refinery capacity is down, as I thought. As of April 2012, US refinery capacity has not been lower since 2005.
SpaceBlues

Houston, TX

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31517
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

fishaholic wrote:
<quoted text>
I would if there was such a thing and I could find one not on a gummint grant that's afraid of losing the utter on his cash cow.
BTW, you should take your own advice.
Your fish is rotten.

Your first sentence describes a denier position. The second contradicts the first.
kristy

Palm Bay, FL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31519
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
Sorry you are so dense. Weather events also include heat records, lack of rain as well as storms.
So show the scientific proof that weather events are becoming more frequent.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain hideaway, SE Spain

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31520
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

2

2

2

kristy wrote:
So show the scientific proof that weather events are becoming more frequent.
There isn't any scientific evidence to support an increase in the frequency of 'extreme' weather events, or even the strength of those events.
The only possible evidence for it, would be that reporting weather events has become easier with modern satellite communications.

Since: Apr 09

Elmont, Long Island NY

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31521
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

kristy wrote:
<quoted text>
So show the scientific proof that weather events are becoming more frequent.
why not just google it

http://usnews.msnbc.msn.com/_news/2012/03/07/...

March on pace for record number of twisters, expert saysBy Kerrie Cassani, weather.com
March literally roared in like a lion, bringing the number of tornadoes so far this year to around 210. That's three times the average number of tornadoes for this time period.

According to records kept by severe weather expert Dr. Greg Forbes, the average would be 72 tornadoes. When it comes to these severe weather events, Forbes says you can't predict the future based on past events because there are many ingredients that come together to create severe outbreaks. Still the rising numbers 2012 really grab your attention.

"January was one of the most active we've had, February was above average because of the tornadoes at the end of the month, and March started off with a bang, " said Forbes.

http://www.noaanews.noaa.gov/2011_tornado_inf...

2011 was an unusually active and deadly year for tornadoes across the U.S., with a total of 1,691 tornadoes reported across the country, more than any other year on record except for 2004, which saw 1,817 tornadoes. Several tornado records were broken in 2011, including for greatest number of tornadoes in a single month (758 in April) and the greatest daily total (200, on April 27).

May 2011

NWS's count of 326 tornadoes occurred during the month of May 2011. There were 178 fatalities in May (158 of those in the Joplin EF-5 tornado alone).

The record number of tornadoes during the month of May was 542 tornadoes set in May 2003.

The average number of tornadoes for the month of May during the past decade is 298.

May is historically the most active month for tornadoes.

This was the deadliest May since 1933.

The deadliest May for tornadoes in the U.S. occurred in 1896, with 502 deaths.
On May 24, 2011, deadly tornadoes claimed 18 lives in Oklahoma (10), Kansas (2), and Arkansas (6).
Before and after aerial photos of St. John's Hospital in Joplin, Mo.

http://www.noaa.gov/extreme2011/

Extreme Weather 2011
A year for the record books

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31522
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

Teddy R wrote:
Then there's this:
http://205.254.135.7/dnav/pet/ hist/LeafHandler.ashx?n=PET &s=MOCLEUS2&f=M
US refinery capacity is down, as I thought. As of April 2012, US refinery capacity has not been lower since 2005.
Why is it down? is the question. First, refineries often go to shutdown and clean out and repair when the market softens. It is not because of reduced real capacity. The percent utilization capacity was about 86% in April. Before the recession it was running about 90+%.

News: Dow Jones
2012/06/06 - Motiva Port Arthur Refinery Crude Unit Down -Source
Print ReprintsCommentRecommend (-)
Bookmark and Share
6-6-12 10:34 AM EDT | E-mail Article

Motiva Enterprises LLC will have to repair the crude distillation unit at its newly expanded refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, for up to three more days before restarting it, a source familiar with the refinery said Wednesday.
Motiva, a joint venture between Royal Dutch Shell (RDSA, RDSA.LN) and state-owned oil behemoth Saudi Arabian Oil Co., or Saudi Aramco, formally commissioned the 325,000 barrel-a-day expansion last week. As of last Thursday, the overall 600,000 barrel-a-day refinery was running at slightly more than 80% capacity.

The company was forced to take the crude unit down after leaks occurred because of loose valves, the source said. A crude distillation unit is the first step in processing crude oil into
fuels.

http://www.morningstar.com/invest/articles/12...

This is a common practice of refineries when their margins decrease.

In 2009 through 2010, as revenue streams in the oil business dried up and profitability of oil refineries fell due to lower demand for product and high reserves of supply preceding the economic recession, oil companies began to close or sell refineries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_refinery

So, you can see that refining capacity is not a bottleneck.

Since: Apr 09

Elmont, Long Island NY

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31523
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Earthling-1 wrote:
<quoted text>There isn't any scientific evidence to support an increase in the frequency of 'extreme' weather events, or even the strength of those events.
The only possible evidence for it, would be that reporting weather events has become easier with modern satellite communications.
duh satellite communication only makes reporting it faster, however news is always reported at some time.

Sorry, but I'll take the word of scientists over you anyday of the week

http://www.noaa.gov/extreme2011/

From extreme drought, heat waves and floods to unprecedented tornado outbreaks, hurricanes, wildfires and winter storms, a record 14 weather and climate disasters in 2011 each caused $1 billion or more in damages — and most regrettably, loss of human lives and property. NOAA's National Weather Service has redoubled its efforts to create a "Weather-Ready Nation", where vulnerable communities are better prepared for extreme weather and other natural disasters.

NOAA forecasts, advisories, watches, warnings and community-based preparedness programs have been and will continue play an even greater role in enhancing the economy and saving lives. A Weather-Ready Nation is one in which businesses, governments and the public are armed with accurate forecasts and other critical information on which to make smart decisions to protect life and property when severe weather threatens

This page recaps some of the strongest and most damaging and deadly hurricanes ever to affect the Atlantic Basin, including the United States. It is not exhaustive and does not include every notable storm in history. This information is provided by the National Hurricane Center and the National Weather Service.

http://www.livescience.com/7568-greatest-hurr...

Note: Dollar amounts, below, are for the year that the hurricane occurred. as of 2008

•GALVESTON 1900
•ATLANTIC-GULF 1919
•MIAMI 1926
•SAN FELIPE-OKEECHOBEE 1928
•FLORIDA KEYS LABOR DAY 1935
•NEW ENGLAND 1938
•GREAT ATLANTIC 1944
•CAROL AND EDNA 1954
•HAZEL 1954
•CONNIE AND DIANE 1955
•AUDREY 1957
•DONNA 1960
•CAMILLE 1969
•AGNES 1972
•TROPICAL STORM CLAUDETTE 1979
•ALICIA 1983
•GILBERT 1988
•HUGO 1989
•ANDREW 1992
•TROPICAL STORM ALBERTO 1994
•OPAL 1995
•MITCH 1998
•FLOYD 1999
•KEITH 2000
•TROPICAL STORM ALLISON 2001
•IRIS 2001
•ISABEL 2003
•CHARLEY 2004
•FRANCES 2004
•IVAN 2004
•JEANNE 2004
•DENNIS 2005
•KATRINA 2005
•RITA 2005
•WILMA 2005
•IKE 2008

notice how the list is heavy on the recent years

EVEN FOX NEWS IS REPORTING IT

Hurricane Season Could Be Strongest Ever, Say Top Meteorologists

http://www.foxnews.com/scitech/2010/05/27/act...
Truth is easy to think

Anonymous Proxy

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31524
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Climategate proved it was a hoax, as well as thousands of other scientists. Still, the Rothschilds pay scientists and the media to promote it. The earth was much warmer in the recent past, and the only correlation between CO2 and temperature is that CO2 rises AFTER temperature increases and falls AFTER the temperature decreases.

CO2 levels have also been much higher in the past and this didn't cause warming.

Big scam wake up.
Teddy R

Canada

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31525
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

Patriot AKA Bozo wrote:
<quoted text>
Why is it down? is the question. First, refineries often go to shutdown and clean out and repair when the market softens. It is not because of reduced real capacity. The percent utilization capacity was about 86% in April. Before the recession it was running about 90+%.
News: Dow Jones
2012/06/06 - Motiva Port Arthur Refinery Crude Unit Down -Source
Print ReprintsCommentRecommend (-)
Bookmark and Share
6-6-12 10:34 AM EDT | E-mail Article
Motiva Enterprises LLC will have to repair the crude distillation unit at its newly expanded refinery in Port Arthur, Texas, for up to three more days before restarting it, a source familiar with the refinery said Wednesday.
Motiva, a joint venture between Royal Dutch Shell (RDSA, RDSA.LN) and state-owned oil behemoth Saudi Arabian Oil Co., or Saudi Aramco, formally commissioned the 325,000 barrel-a-day expansion last week. As of last Thursday, the overall 600,000 barrel-a-day refinery was running at slightly more than 80% capacity.
The company was forced to take the crude unit down after leaks occurred because of loose valves, the source said. A crude distillation unit is the first step in processing crude oil into
fuels.
http://www.morningstar.com/invest/articles/12...
This is a common practice of refineries when their margins decrease.
In 2009 through 2010, as revenue streams in the oil business dried up and profitability of oil refineries fell due to lower demand for product and high reserves of supply preceding the economic recession, oil companies began to close or sell refineries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Oil_refinery
So, you can see that refining capacity is not a bottleneck.
Yes - and these occurrences affect capacity, and supply, as well:

http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story...

http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505245_162-573836...

http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-09/gaso...

http://www2.nbc4i.com/news/2012/jun/02/8/fire...

I would point out that an aged/inefficient/obsolescent refinery closed because it has become uneconomic to run is still US domestic capacity lost. When domestic refining is not keeping pace with demand for motor fuels, we should expect prices will be higher.

Since: Mar 09

Wichita, KS

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31526
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Teddy R wrote:
<quoted text>
Yes - and these occurrences affect capacity, and supply, as well:
http://abclocal.go.com/wpvi/story...
http://www.cbsnews.com/8301-505245_162-573836...
http://www.bloomberg.com/news/2012-05-09/gaso...
http://www2.nbc4i.com/news/2012/jun/02/8/fire...
I would point out that an aged/inefficient/obsolescent refinery closed because it has become uneconomic to run is still US domestic capacity lost. When domestic refining is not keeping pace with demand for motor fuels, we should expect prices will be higher.
Working in the refining business for 23 years, some small refineries were shutdown because it was often not profitable to upgrade but most were bought by large corporations and shutdown. The refinery where I worked was efficient and profitable but it did not fit into the scheme of things at the time. It was bought up and dismantled by a large company. When the small refineries were closed, it became easier to control the market.

Large refineries are upgraded on the run. Those that were not, closed a long time ago. The margins on refineries is quite small due to the enormous capacity. Sometimes just a few cents on the gallon of refined products. Of course disasters cause problems as we saw with Katrina, but in general refining capacity is not a bottleneck in our supply of gasoline.

“Happy, warm and comfortable”

Since: Oct 10

Mountain hideaway, SE Spain

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#31527
Jul 14, 2012
 

Judged:

2

1

1

Karma is a_______ wrote:
Hurricane Season Could Be Strongest Ever, Say Top Meteorologists
They've been saying that since Katrina in 2005.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Showing posts 29,821 - 29,840 of45,761
|
Go to last page| Jump to page:
Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

•••
•••
•••
•••

Windsor Jobs

•••
Enter and win $5000
•••
•••

Windsor People Search

Addresses and phone numbers for FREE

•••

Windsor News, Events & Info

Click for news, events and info in Windsor
•••

Personal Finance

Mortgages [ See current mortgage rates ]
•••