chicken plant

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Ash Flat, AR

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#1
Jul 8, 2013
 

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rumored 1000 jobs coming to the area. both a processing plant and grain center.
will walnut ridge or corning or poplar bluff get them because we have no rail service here?
Another project

Ash Flat, AR

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Jul 8, 2013
 

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info wrote:
rumored 1000 jobs coming to the area. both a processing plant and grain center.
will walnut ridge or corning or poplar bluff get them because we have no rail service here?
We got 5 rivers that they can dump the left over garbage in.
That will be a big selling point for those owners.
Plenty of chickens being raised in Randolph county and the Eleven Point is going to get a big dose of chicken shit from those new chicken houses out on highway 93.
info

Ash Flat, AR

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Jul 8, 2013
 

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figured most of the house litter now goes to the bottoms as fertilizer.

plants use about all the chicken. have little waste other than waste water and it is treated and regulated closely.

figure a big plant would put in their own water plant and sewer system.

need the jobs. figure a rural area would be best. north or east of town. biggers or maybe okean/delaplaine for the railroad would be close enough.
not sure if both the feed mill and plant would need railroad. figure the mill would be located nearer the hills and growing houses, but would also need to be near an adequate corn supply.
seems like pokey would be logical location for a mill.
junkie jones

Ash Flat, AR

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Jul 9, 2013
 

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We will need some illegals to work there,and no we wont need a rail,most ice packed foods don't go rail.
Environmental destruction

Ash Flat, AR

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Jul 9, 2013
 

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info wrote:
figured most of the house litter now goes to the bottoms as fertilizer.
plants use about all the chicken. have little waste other than waste water and it is treated and regulated closely.
figure a big plant would put in their own water plant and sewer system.
need the jobs. figure a rural area would be best. north or east of town. biggers or maybe okean/delaplaine for the railroad would be close enough.
not sure if both the feed mill and plant would need railroad. figure the mill would be located nearer the hills and growing houses, but would also need to be near an adequate corn supply.
seems like pokey would be logical location for a mill.
figure this those big new broiler house that are in easy walking distance to the Eleven Point river are going to destroy that river. All the manure produced is going to be spread near the river.
Those Mennonites involved in this don't care about what harm they will be doing, just the $$ they can spend on those Black cars they drive.
Most new jobs that might be created with a Chicken Plant will go to illegals or imported Marshall Islanders and just turning this area into another little Mexico.
It is time to complain to the USA EPA about this mess before it gets worse.
Environmental destruction

Ash Flat, AR

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Jul 9, 2013
 

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Figure this the cold hard facts about chicken pollution
II. Environmental Impacts of Poultry Production

A. General Impacts

The magnitude of the manure problem in Arkansas is almost beyond belief. A table best illustrates the scope of the problem

[SEE TABLE IN ORIGINAL]

The massive amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium generated by this manure can have a serious detrimental impact on the environment. When the wastes are not properly managed, these chemicals are washed away by way of surface runoff. 44 The concentrations of these chemicals can be quite high, resulting in environmental impacts including enrichment of lakes and ponds generating excessive growth of algae causing taste, odor, and aesthetic problems and decreasing the value for water supply and recreation. Fish can be killed in ponds with serious algae problems. Opportunities for fishing can be reduced. Decaying algae and other plans sic deplete dissolved oxygen supplies, thus suffocating fish. High levels of nitrate in groundwater used for water supply can cause methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder in infants, also known as "blue baby disease." 45

To exacerbate this problem, it is difficult to estimate the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that reach ground and surface waters. 46 The concentration of pollutants resulting from improper manure management practices will vary based on the kind and amount of manure, the bedding and feeding practices, the disposal methods, and the location of disposal activity with respect to soils, surface water and rainfall. 47 For example, from 10 to 20 percent of the nitrogen and phosphorus in manure which has been spread on frozen or snow-covered fields can be washed away in runoff from rains and snowmelt. 48

In addition to the chemical dangers, fecal coliform bacteria are present in the excrements of all warm-blooded animals. 49 These bacteria present health risks to humans swimming in or consuming the contaminated waters. 50 Further, other harmful organisms often accompany fecals, since "bacteria, viruses, protozoans, and fungi are among the potential pathogens." 51

Poultry production also generates large amounts of solids, volatile solids, biochemical oxygen demands (BODs), and chemical oxygen demands (CODs). 52 Per 1,000 pounds of live weight, poultry produce the following on a daily basis: 13.9 pounds of total solids; 10.8 pounds of volatile solids; 3.4 pounds of BODs; and 12.5 pounds of CODs. 53 Moreover, poultry manure generates tremendous amounts of heavy metals as the following table illustrates:

[SEE TABLE IN ORIGINAL]

Converting the metals from mg/kg into pounds per day, based on the 5100 tons of poultry manure produced daily in Arkansas, clearly illustrates the massive amounts of deadly metals that are being disseminated daily into the environment. It would appear logical that these enormous discharges would fall under the hazardous waste provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). However, agriculture wastes used fertilizers are excluded from Subtitle C of RCRA which identifies hazardous wastes. 55 Yet a toxicologist for the EPA has stated that "arsenic is a known carcinogenic agent that when inhaled can cause cancer in humans, particularly lung cancer."
Facts are wrong

Jonesboro, AR

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#7
Jul 9, 2013
 

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Environmental destruction wrote:
Figure this the cold hard facts about chicken pollution
II. Environmental Impacts of Poultry Production
A. General Impacts
The magnitude of the manure problem in Arkansas is almost beyond belief. A table best illustrates the scope of the problem
[SEE TABLE IN ORIGINAL]
The massive amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium generated by this manure can have a serious detrimental impact on the environment. When the wastes are not properly managed, these chemicals are washed away by way of surface runoff. 44 The concentrations of these chemicals can be quite high, resulting in environmental impacts including enrichment of lakes and ponds generating excessive growth of algae causing taste, odor, and aesthetic problems and decreasing the value for water supply and recreation. Fish can be killed in ponds with serious algae problems. Opportunities for fishing can be reduced. Decaying algae and other plans sic deplete dissolved oxygen supplies, thus suffocating fish. High levels of nitrate in groundwater used for water supply can cause methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder in infants, also known as "blue baby disease." 45
To exacerbate this problem, it is difficult to estimate the concentrations of nitrogen, phosphorus, and potassium that reach ground and surface waters. 46 The concentration of pollutants resulting from improper manure management practices will vary based on the kind and amount of manure, the bedding and feeding practices, the disposal methods, and the location of disposal activity with respect to soils, surface water and rainfall. 47 For example, from 10 to 20 percent of the nitrogen and phosphorus in manure which has been spread on frozen or snow-covered fields can be washed away in runoff from rains and snowmelt. 48
In addition to the chemical dangers, fecal coliform bacteria are present in the excrements of all warm-blooded animals. 49 These bacteria present health risks to humans swimming in or consuming the contaminated waters. 50 Further, other harmful organisms often accompany fecals, since "bacteria, viruses, protozoans, and fungi are among the potential pathogens." 51
Poultry production also generates large amounts of solids, volatile solids, biochemical oxygen demands (BODs), and chemical oxygen demands (CODs). 52 Per 1,000 pounds of live weight, poultry produce the following on a daily basis: 13.9 pounds of total solids; 10.8 pounds of volatile solids; 3.4 pounds of BODs; and 12.5 pounds of CODs. 53 Moreover, poultry manure generates tremendous amounts of heavy metals as the following table illustrates:
[SEE TABLE IN ORIGINAL]
Converting the metals from mg/kg into pounds per day, based on the 5100 tons of poultry manure produced daily in Arkansas, clearly illustrates the massive amounts of deadly metals that are being disseminated daily into the environment. It would appear logical that these enormous discharges would fall under the hazardous waste provisions of the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA). However, agriculture wastes used fertilizers are excluded from Subtitle C of RCRA which identifies hazardous wastes. 55 Yet a toxicologist for the EPA has stated that "arsenic is a known carcinogenic agent that when inhaled can cause cancer in humans, particularly lung cancer."
. lower parts of Arkansas.. They are trying to get this in Benton Arkansas. Jonesboro is also working this. You are a very bad Person trying to mess with families life's . Pocahontas and Walnut Ridge is trying to get great jobs come. Batesville Arkansas has plants why don't you talk about them. PEOPLE NEEDS JOBS! I have a QUESTION ? What would you bring here for JOBS? Rest my case! Your facts are wrong.
Environmental destruction

Ash Flat, AR

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#8
Jul 9, 2013
 

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Facts are wrong wrote:
<quoted text>. lower parts of Arkansas.. They are trying to get this in Benton Arkansas. Jonesboro is also working this. You are a very bad Person trying to mess with families life's . Pocahontas and Walnut Ridge is trying to get great jobs come. Batesville Arkansas has plants why don't you talk about them. PEOPLE NEEDS JOBS! I have a QUESTION ? What would you bring here for JOBS? Rest my case! Your facts are wrong.
You are a sleaze ball, The facts are right on and You Know it!There has TO BE A BALANCE BETWEEN JOBS AND PERMANENTLY INJURIHG OUR HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT.You are also a Moron and a fool if you think "good jobs are minimum wage" jobs that mostly taken by illegal aliens and imported Marhsall Islanders(that's who Tyson brought here to work at their slaughter plants).
Ok so do you want to work in a E. Coli and Salomnella infected processing plant . You would be great at hauling the chicken guts out to dump in the Black river.
Environmental destruction

Ash Flat, AR

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#9
Jul 9, 2013
 

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Facts are wrong wrote:
<quoted text>. lower parts of Arkansas.. They are trying to get this in Benton Arkansas. Jonesboro is also working this. You are a very bad Person trying to mess with families life's . Pocahontas and Walnut Ridge is trying to get great jobs come. Batesville Arkansas has plants why don't you talk about them. PEOPLE NEEDS JOBS! I have a QUESTION ? What would you bring here for JOBS? Rest my case! Your facts are wrong.
Where are your facts?
You haven't got any do you.
here is more information
Oh isn't that 7 million $ hole in the ground supposed to bring jobs here. They will probably build that slaughter plant so those using the pool can enjoy that delicious odor from the dead chickens
The poultry industry is a major cause of environmental degradation in the United States. It kills fish and other wildlife and it makes people sick. In nature chickens and turkeys range in small flocks over wide areas contributing to the health and beauty of the land. In poultry factory farming, thousands of birds are crammed unnaturally into extremely small areas. Filth, ugliness and disease are the result of this unwholesome and unnatural confinement of living creatures. dead_turkey (63K)
photo by Garrett Sevold
U.S. slaughterhouses now kill more than 30 million birds every day, 10 billion birds a year (NASS). This carnage pollutes land, air, and water with diseased carcasses, feces, heavy metals, chemicals, bacteria, parasites, pathogen cysts, and viruses (Report 9). Poisoned well water is a major problem on the Delmarva Peninsula (the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia), which slaughters over 600 million chickens a year, resulting in an annual 3.2 billion pounds of raw waste, 13.8 million pounds of phosphorous, and 48.2 million pounds of nitrogen (Harkin 11). A typical slaughter plant kills over a quarter of a million chickens and uses 2 million gallons of water per day (Lipton A18).
Awash in Manure
In the 1990s, poultry production in 5 West Virginia counties at the headwaters of the Potomac River, which nourishes the Chesapeake Bay, grew from 7 million birds a year to 100 million birds, now producing enough manure to cover "all 160 miles of Los Angeles freeways ankle deep" (Gerstenzang A7).
U.S. chicken producers use a total of 2.2 million pounds of the antibiotic arsenic compound roxarsone each year. More than 95 percent of the roxarsone fed to chickens is excreted in chicken waste which is regularly applied as fertilizer. The arsenic from these applications can leach into surface and ground water supplies and be transformed into inorganic arsenic, a known carcinogen (Hopey, 2008).
The Delmarva Peninsula produces a million tons of manure a year, enough to fill a football stadium "to the top row, including all the concourses, locker rooms and concession areas" (Warrick & Shields A1, A22).
In California, an egg factory with 837,000 caged hens produces 21,000 cubic yards of manure per year--"the equivalent of about 1,400 dump truck loads" (Dirkx A1).
A poultry researcher states, "The amount of animal wastes produced in the U.S. is staggering. In chickens, for example, the daily production of wastes is essentially equal to the amount of feed used.. Factory Poultry Manure Harms Wildlife, Habitat, and Human Health
Poultry manure contains large amounts of nitrogen, phosphorous, and potassium.. The annual litter from a typical broiler chicken house of 22,000 birds contains as much phosphorous as in the sewage from a community of 6,000 people. Excess nitrogen converts to ammonia and nitrates, burning the fragile cells of land plants and poisoning ground and surface waters. Concentrated poultry waste spawns excess algae that consume aquatic nutrients and block sunlight needed by underwater grasses. In decay, the algae suffocate fish. High levels of nitrate in groundwater used as drinking water can cause methemoglobinemia, a blood disorder in infants, known also as "blue baby disease" (Holleman 28).

Since: Apr 12

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#10
Jul 9, 2013
 

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If you like to fish then you would not want more chicken houses.
B. Impacts on Fish

Fish populations have been dramatically impacted by poultry production according to state wildlife officials. 67 In particu lar, the smallmouth bass of northern Arkansas have suffered a great deal. The smallmouth live only in clear waters of the Ozark and Ouachita mountains. 68 These cool, clear and previously clean mountain streams and lakes are the only areas of the state where these fish thrive. 69 Moreover, "Arkansas' smallmouth streams are legendary throughout the country. Its blue-ribbon haunts in the Ozarks include Crooked Creek, Kings River, and the Buffalo River." 70 Each of these streams have segments listed as impaired by confined animal operations. 71

Arkansas Game and Fish Commission (AG&F) Fisheries Research Biologist Steve Filipek has been studying smallmouth bass populations and streams since 1987. 72 No stream surveying had been conducted since 1950, so virtually nothing was known about current smallmouth populations. 73 It is important to study the population because, as Filipek states:

Smallmouth bass, better than any other native sportfish, are excellent indicators of water quality and the integrity of a stream system. Many of the streams we looked at first were those that had the possibility of being dammed or were ones with pollution problems.... That's when we began to notice that we were having problems with things like gravel operations, channel modification, sewage and other forms of pollution and habitat degradation. 74

There is also a problem with the direct dumping of poultry waste into nearby streams. 75 Direct dumping of wastes, as well as the common practice of spreading the manure in fields, leads to a heavy load of chemicals leaching into the soil and running off into the water. 76 The effects on smallmouth are dramatic. The fish are found with tumors or heavy parasitic infections. 77 Furthermore, nitrates from the litter reduce dissolved oxygen, causing fish kills. 78 Moreover, the increased nutrients cause blooms of blue-green algae. 79 These heavy loads of nitrogen are too much for the smallmouth to withstand.

The same is true for most of the food chain. 80 Patterson explained that a heavy load of nitrogen "makes the stream unstable ... because you don't have a broad base of insects doing well. It's not just a minor, once-in-a-while thing. It's continuous. Every time it rains, more and more gets into the stream." 81 To make matters worse, the soil and every other part of the environment has been permeated by chicken manure. Patterson continued by emphasizing that "the whole northwest part of the state is so overloaded and has been for so long. If they stopped land applying poultry waste we'd probably still see the effects for years to come." 82

It is a tragedy that one industry, virtually unregulated, has been allowed to destroy some of the nation's most pristine waters. The destruction of water quality leads to the slow eradication of the native fish species, especially sensitive species like smallmouth bass. As some Arkansas biologists have written: "Smallmouth are arguably our most esoteric native sportfish. We associate them with our purest, least disturbed mountain streams and greatly value their fighting ability. Conserving and enhancing our smallmouth fisheries should be a high priority." 83
They have already destroyed streams in NW Arkansas so now they want to finish off NE Arkansas.
That ought to be good for increasing the tourist trade.
Bubba

Mountain Home, AR

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#11
Jul 9, 2013
 

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So what? We're gonna have us a seven and a half million dollar pool! That's all that matters! We don't need no jobs, clean air, pure water or no stupid fish as long as we got our pool!
really

Ash Flat, AR

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#12
Jul 9, 2013
 

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reaching here -
"hauling the chicken guts out to dump in the Black river."

can we assume the Batesville plant dumps guts in the white river?
ever heard of sewer treatment plants.

what does Pocahontas put into the black river?
Chicken Little

United States

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Jul 9, 2013
 

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Environmental destruction wrote:
<quoted text>Delmarva Peninsula (the Eastern Shore of Maryland, Delaware, and Virginia), which slaughters over 600 million chickens a year, resulting in an annual 3.2 billion pounds of raw waste
I call BS. That's over 5 pounds of waste in an 8 pound chicken
Environmental destruction

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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#14
Jul 9, 2013
 

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Chicken Little wrote:
<quoted text>
I call BS. That's over 5 pounds of waste in an 8 pound chicken
Those chickens are just like you "full of Shit"
type of jobs U will get

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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Jul 9, 2013
 

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Environmental destruction wrote:
<quoted text> You are a sleaze ball, The facts are right on and You Know it!There has TO BE A BALANCE BETWEEN JOBS AND PERMANENTLY INJURIHG OUR HEALTH AND THE ENVIRONMENT.You are also a Moron and a fool if you think "good jobs are minimum wage" jobs that mostly taken by illegal aliens and imported Marhsall Islanders(that's who Tyson brought here to work at their slaughter plants).
Ok so do you want to work in a E. Coli and Salomnella infected processing plant . You would be great at hauling the chicken guts out to dump in the Black river.
Typical poultry line workers are relatively unskilled, less educated, often members of minority groups and much lower paid than workers in the red meat and manufacturing sectors. Turnover is unusually high in certain aspects of the process. Live hanging, deboning and sanitation jobs are particularly stressful and have high turnover rates. Poultry processing by its nature is a largely rural-based industry found in economically depressed areas where there is a labor surplus.

Because of sanitation requirements, guarded rotating equipment often cannot be silenced for noise-abatement purposes. Consequently, in the majority of the processing plantís production areas, there is high noise exposure.



Receiving and live hang

The first step in processing involves off-loading of the modules and destacking the trays onto a conveyor system to the live hang area. Work here is in almost complete darkness, since this has a quieting effect on the birds. The conveyor belt with a tray is at about waist level. A hanger, with gloved hands, must reach and grab a bird by both thighs and hang its feet in a shackle on an overhead conveyor travelling in the opposite direction.

The hazards of the operation vary. Aside from the normal high level of noise, the darkness and the disorienting effect of opposite running conveyors, there is the dust from flapping birds, suddenly sprayed urine or faeces in the face and the possibility of a gloved finger being caught in a shackle. Hangers are constantly striking the backs of their hands against neighboring shackles as they pass overhead.

It is not uncommon for a hanger to be required to hang an average of 23 (or more) birds per minute.(Some positions on the hangerís lines require more physical motions, perhaps 26 birds per minute.) Typically, seven hangers on one line may hang 38,640 birds in 4 hours before they get a break. If each bird weighs approximately 1.9 kg, each hanger conceivably lifts a total of 1,057 kg during the first 4 hours of his or her shift before a scheduled break. The hangerís job is extremely stressful from both a physiological and psychological standpoint. The constant grabbing with both hands, pulling in and simultaneously lifting a flapping, scratching bird at shoulder or head height is stressful to the upper shoulder and neck.

The birdís feathers and feet can easily scratch a hangerís unprotected arms. The hangers are required to stand for prolonged periods of time on hard surfaces, which can lead to lower-back discomfort and pain.
The poultry industry is an interesting blend of labour-intensive operations and high-tech processing. Human sweat and anguish still characterize the industry The industry generally does not attract highly skilled technicians because of the mediocre pay levels, extremely stressful working conditions.
Most poultry processing plants in Arkansas pay their workers $7.50
per hour to start.
This is just the kind of Jobs we will get here in Pocahontas along with the problems of illegals.
You ready to pay higher school taxes to teach all these Mexican kids?
You want 8 Mexicans living in the same house who have no car insurance?
How about the increased crime that will be coming with those Poultry plant workers?

diseases U get

Horseshoe Bend, AR

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#16
Jul 9, 2013
 

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Yes Sir just what we will be needing is another high pollution ,low wages employer here.
But it's a job.
According to a new report, the workers who process chicken for the largest poultry companies in the country are exposed to harmful conditions. And if new USDA rules go into effect, they will get worse and could put the health of consumers at risk.

The report, "Unsafe at These Speeds," was conducted by the Southern Poverty Law Center and Alabama Appleseed Center for Law & Justice. It is based on interviews with more than 300 current and former poultry workers.

One of the interviewees described the average chicken processing plant as a "house of pain," where workers are under pressure to work at breakneck speeds, making them susceptible to an array of injuries and exposing them to harmful chemicals.
Higher than normal incidents of carpal tunnel, back pains

Part of the problem is the nature of the job. Work at a chicken processing plant involves a great deal of repetitive motion in cold temperatures, making workers highly vulnerable to carpal tunnel syndrome and gnarled fingers. And because there are no set ergonomic standards in these workplaces, poultry processors do little to prevent the dangerous conditions, the report says.

"Poultry workers are two and a half times more likely to have carpal tunnel than non-poultry workers," Dr. Susan Quandt, who has studied the health issues of poultry workers in North Carolina.

Quandt added that there are higher than normal reports of musculo-skeletal injuries, shoulder injuries, and lower back injuries among poultry workers caused by the repetitive work, awkward postures, and lack of ergonomic standards.

There have also been cases of poultry workers developing pachydermodactyly, a rare condition also known as "elephant fingers," that causes chronically swollen knuckles and burning joint pains. Quandt believes the condition is caused by repeated minor trauma to the fingers, which is necessary for poultry hangers, the workers responsible for hanging chicken carcasses on conveyor belt hooks.
Lung diseases reported

When workers try to seek medical treatment, they are threatened with termination and, for the many undocumented workers in the poultry industry, deportation, the report claims.

"[Workers] are discouraged from reporting work-related injuries and forced to endure constant pain," said Tom Fritzsche, author of the report. "They are also discouraged from slowing down the processing line - even when they're hurt."

Respiratory illnesses among poultry workers have also been reported. Natashia Ford worked at a Wayne Farms chicken processing plant in Northern Alabama for six years. During that time, she developed histoplasmosis, a lung disease similar to tuberculosis that's caused by breathing airborne spores at the plant, the SPLC report said.

The company initially refused to pay Ford's medical bills. But after she sued, they agreed to pay a portion of her medical expenses.

Ford also said that because the plant did not provide adequate protective gear, "chicken juices" - the liquid and chemical runoff from chicken carcasses - would seep into her eyes, ears and mouth. That was a common complain among poultry workers in the report.


Curmudgeon

Pocahontas, AR

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#18
Jul 13, 2013
 

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Im glad I moved away from randolph county. There are chicken houses all over the eleven point river watershed. And the litter from them is mainly spread in the hill,s. Ive seen the litter from those houses on Hwy 93 being hauled away on the highway by a john deer tractor pulling a big humongious field spreader. You know it was being spread someplace close. The chester family piled up big stinky piles of litter and let it sit for weeks before spreading it on their parnent,s home place and the 11 point border,s that entire farm. In addition to the houses on 93 owned by the mennonites the are some near Dalton within sight of the river. Probably are lot more chicken houses you cannott see from the highway.Swim and eat fish from the 11 point river? I think not!
mennonitesbuilt4 more

Oxford, AR

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#19
Jul 13, 2013
 

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Curmudgeon wrote:
Im glad I moved away from randolph county. There are chicken houses all over the eleven point river watershed. And the litter from them is mainly spread in the hill,s. Ive seen the litter from those houses on Hwy 93 being hauled away on the highway by a john deer tractor pulling a big humongious field spreader. You know it was being spread someplace close. The chester family piled up big stinky piles of litter and let it sit for weeks before spreading it on their parnent,s home place and the 11 point border,s that entire farm. In addition to the houses on 93 owned by the mennonites the are some near Dalton within sight of the river. Probably are lot more chicken houses you cannott see from the highway.Swim and eat fish from the 11 point river? I think not!
Yes those wonderful mennonites are building 4 more. that should really screw up the ground water and the 11 point river. Algea bloom is already showing up on the river could this be from all that chicken manure polluting it?
mennonitesbuilt4 more

Oxford, AR

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#20
Jul 13, 2013
 

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Curmudgeon wrote:
Im glad I moved away from randolph county. There are chicken houses all over the eleven point river watershed. And the litter from them is mainly spread in the hill,s. Ive seen the litter from those houses on Hwy 93 being hauled away on the highway by a john deer tractor pulling a big humongious field spreader. You know it was being spread someplace close. The chester family piled up big stinky piles of litter and let it sit for weeks before spreading it on their parnent,s home place and the 11 point border,s that entire farm. In addition to the houses on 93 owned by the mennonites the are some near Dalton within sight of the river. Probably are lot more chicken houses you cannott see from the highway.Swim and eat fish from the 11 point river? I think not!
Yes these sleaze ball chicken plants do have a history of destroying the rivers and ground water supplies.
But that's alright because they do hire those illegal aliens and pay slave wages.
Read this and weep.
During the past decade, Tyson has been involved in several lawsuits related to air and water pollution. In June 2003, the company admitted to illegally dumping untreated wastewater from its poultry processing plant near Sedalia, Missouri, pleading guilty to 20 felony violations of the federal Clean Water Act. As part of the plea agreement, the company agreed to pay $7.5 million in fines, hire an outside consultant to perform an environmental audit, and institute an "enhanced environmental management system" at the Sedalia plant. At the same time, Tyson also settled a case filed by the Missouri attorney general's office related to the same illegal dumping.

The United States Environmental Protection Agency began the investigation into the discharges in 1997, and federal officials served two criminal search warrants at the plant in 1999. According to EPA and U.S. Department of Justice officials, Tyson continued to illegally dump wastewater after the search warrants were executed, prompting an EPA senior trial attorney to remark that: "Having done this work for nearly 20 years, I don't recall any case where violations continued after the execution of two search warrants. That's stunning." Under the federal and state plea agreements, Tyson agreed to pay $5.5 million to the federal government,$1 million to the Pettis County School Fund and $1 million to the Missouri Natural Resources Protection Fund to help remedy the damage.

In 2002, three residents of Western Kentucky, together with the Sierra Club, filed a lawsuit concerning the discharge of dangerous quantities of ammonia from Tyson's Western Kentucky factories. Tyson settled the suit in January 2005, agreeing to spend $500,000 to mitigate and monitor the ammonia levels.

In 2004, Tyson was one of six poultry companies to pay a $7.3 million settlement fee to the city of Tulsa, Oklahoma, to settle charges that the use of chicken waste as fertilizer had created phosphorus pollution in Tulsa's main drinking water sources.
Jobs come first

Ravenden, AR

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#21
Jul 13, 2013
 

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Who cares about the 11 point. It is a river that a few people with cabins along it think they own! We should have put a dam on it years ago!!!
mennonitesbuilt4more wrote:
<quoted text>Yes those wonderful mennonites are building 4 more. that should really screw up the ground water and the 11 point river. Algea bloom is already showing up on the river could this be from all that chicken manure polluting it?

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