Turkey Vultures and wild hogs

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Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#1
Jul 3, 2012
 
Anyone noticed the single Turkey vulture on northeast side of town? It is working cheaper than animal control. Have seen it with cat or possibly skunk in talons and a chicken on another occasion. He's about seven foot wingspan and circles ely road, wrather, starnes and willohby street area. Seeing it couple times a week and usually exits town around sand pit maybe heading for floodways or lake but more likely camped at sand pit where possum skunk cat and dogs are plentiful and people aren't.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#2
Jul 3, 2012
 
It didn't ask for overpriced pound, overpriced new animal control truck for personal use or a paycheck for hours not worked while laid up at home and does a hell of a lot better job. Its checking neighborhood regularly and never unavailable or overhoused like animal control claims all the time. Don't have to leave message at kpd everytime for her to get back to you at later time but never does. It likes its job and always working without needing recognized or pushed out the door making excuses.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#3
Jul 3, 2012
 
Oh, I almost forgot feral hogs population growing and burying wild ones on Arkansas side couple miles north. Escaped from curtain farm over last several years and are starting to morphology with the coarse dark hair and large tusks suitable for mounts. Seen one wit 4to6 inch tusks. His days coming. Soooweee!!!
Mr. Sir

Kennett, MO

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#4
Jul 3, 2012
 
It's a Bald Eagle. It had a nest on the floodways, if your going towards Hayti it's on the left before you get to the first ditch.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#5
Jul 3, 2012
 
Yes sir, black with white on wings and no feathers on head. Looks and acts nothing like a bald fucktard. Hunters and truckers know the difference. And for your info there are several balds in that area. And just as balds migrated back to here so did vultures from Kentucky. They can smell chicken production sights for miles. I opened a trailer coming out of Kentucky once and several vultures were sealed inside. I released them at Dexter. I guess the hogs I been following and watching are really muskrats huh? Remind me never hire you as a game guide.
old friend

Bellevue, WA

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#6
Jul 5, 2012
 
I too saw a turkey vulture over a month ago between malden nd parma. It was in the middle of the road eating on a dead carcus. This bird was huge with a gigantic wingspan.. I was fascinated nd scared at the same time. Wish i had taken a picture of it.
the more you know

Pleasant Hill, MO

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#7
Jul 5, 2012
 
you people are clueless. turkey vultures only eat the dead and unless that cat, skunk, whatever has been sitting a while they won't touch it.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#8
Jul 5, 2012
 
Actually, you are the clueless one. You like a lot of other topix addict are so malcontent looking for combative confrontation you assume you read what wasn't even written. Actually a Turkey culture will eat an animalxnot dead yet but injured although since I couldn't identify thecspecies exactly due to distance one would assume if thinking clearly that I hadn't implied living. Being that I have traveled quite extensively in the southwest as a trucker iceould definitely know the difference in bird species since every truckstop t-shirts usually has a truck, male bald eagle and a lot of times a Harley. So if I refer to a nice bike I am probably talking about a Harley not a Schwinn. It WAS a TURKEY VULTURE shock not only refers to species but family. Study subject a little more. Even bald eagles tend to make sure animals are dead before flying with them for safety, stability in air and to prevent injury to self, young and the nest. Need any more info. We also have videos of both incidents for your scrutiny and crowing pleasure just so we can watch you eat a little crow. The look of shame on your face is worth a fortune.
old friend

Bellevue, WA

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#9
Jul 5, 2012
 
I too know what I saw. Plus when I got home, I went online to find out what type of bird it was. These creatures are taking back their habitat, since they were here before us humans. Man has destroyed their homes. Or havent you noticed that the animals arent afraid of us anymore. That vulture was so big, it could have picked up a small child in one swoop. Me nd my mom just stayed in the car and watch it fly away with the dead carcus in its talons!!
old friend

Bellevue, WA

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#10
Jul 5, 2012
 
That was my first time seeing a vulture. I had no ideal that they existed around here until that sunday coming home from church. Its fascinating that they are here in this area and are striving so well. Gods creatures are everywhere now.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#11
Jul 6, 2012
 
Your right, they as well as eagles and invasive species such as armadillo,skunk etc have made great comebacks. Invasive species had no trouble either even fire ants and recently I caught a rhinocerous beetle in piggott. Due to product transports cross country and pet release and changing climate. I recall in sixties and seventies very few skunks were here and I have watched the progression of armadillos from around seventy nine at Louisiana/Arkansas border to present day as far north as middle Missouri and Illinois vulture from southwest states to as far north as Minnesota Illinois Indiana just in a span of twenty years or so due mainly to the increase in production of poultry. I in last couple years have sat at poultry factories in northern Kentucky and watched Turkey vultures fight for poultry scraps outside my sleeper while unloading and have to honk horn to get out of truck as they will not move out of your way even running into dogfood docks and grabbing poultry from conveyors next to workers. Like you said I have no trouble identifying them. Featherless heads, coal black feathers with white highlight on underside of six to eight foot wingspan. Look absolutely nothing like a bald eagle. By the way the bald eagle you speak of is common knowledge especially on topix. But last several years bald population has increased exponentially inthis area with several hunting together in fields between Bragg city and braggadocio and several lone eagles hunting the ponds along I 55. There are several nests hidden in Bootheel but I will refrain from telling location as they tend to need and demand solitude when nesting and shouldn't be disturbed. Amatuers or thrill seekers can and do disrupt the nesting cycles of these majestic animals. Try keeping info to yourself on nesting sights for the sakecof the animals. As far as vultures go I have had stowaways in a sealed truck without my knowledge til doors were opened but never a bald eagle. I think I am,as good an expert as anyone at identifying species and have even gotten pretty good at identifying differences in markings and habits not to mention territories of local balds. Think I have the job of identifying under control as I am astounded by great birds of prey from a distance since gamewarden Brooks gave me permission to care for a hawk ixfound injured from pellet gun in kennett about 35 or 40 years ago which gave me a great appreciation of these animals. Been photographing and admiring them ever since and studying habits and territories etc just as a hobby. Rayburn Brooks was a great warden and knew how to promote conservation and interest without being an ass in his job or catering to farmers landowners and the rich. These new wardens could have learned far more from him than state trooper wannabe school. About the animals conservation people and how to create harmony among them so that hunting could be respected and enjoyed without fear of prosecution by overbearing wardens who overstep with control to create revenue and control public land for adjacent landowners. Another corruption that has become prevelant around the area.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#12
Jul 6, 2012
 
As a hunter I am more interested in the hogs as they are invasive, very destructive and dangerous not to mention one hell of axdamn fun adrenaline pumping thrill hunt. Even with a gun and knowledge of these hogs you have to be aware as they are hunting you also. Soooweee!! Pretty damn good eating to and that skull with tusks is a hell of a trophy to tell stories to kids about while they admire it. Of course we throw in the scar from a motorcycle wreck on my thigh just to hold and printed their interest and safety when hunting. I wont tell them if you don't..
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#13
Jul 6, 2012
 
Promote their interest not printed their interest. Hell of a lot better shot than I am a typer.
old friend

Bellevue, WA

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#14
Jul 6, 2012
 
Yes, the animals have been released here in the bootheel. I always thought that armadillos lived in places like texas, but its so many around here too nd they have adjusted to this climate so well. Plus look at the over population of deer in these recent years. Wasnt it in Puxico or Advance where they has snakes invading their town. Its like a scary movie= day of the animals.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#15
Jul 6, 2012
 
I guess its according to how you view them. To a hunter its like fantasy island but point taken. I remember dad and grandparents telling stories around an old wood stove of a mightiness in the sixties before we got a TV about bobcats and panthers cutting screens of a mightiness in floodwater area when it mas mostly swamp. And about eagles and rattlers and moccasins big around as your arm. Weasel, beaver, otter were plentiful. They cleared land and hunted for a living then and when the corps dug floodways the men went and stayed in camps along the system with as many as 100 tents in their camp. They had armed guards watching at night. Dad had a picture of him and a large cat he called a panther but looked more like a black leopard. I always dreamed of what it was like and I am proud to see their return. There are a lot of large bobcats around and someone tells a story of panther on their farm at St Francis river levee on Arkansas side. Just wonder if we possibly have a few leopards still in barpits. That would be awesome though you would probably never see them. The earth has a way of purging and restoring. So thankful that before I die I have seen these animals near my home. Its a wonderful thing.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#16
Jul 6, 2012
 
old friend wrote:
Yes, the animals have been released here in the bootheel. I always thought that armadillos lived in places like texas, but its so many around here too nd they have adjusted to this climate so well. Plus look at the over population of deer in these recent years. Wasnt it in Puxico or Advance where they has snakes invading their town. Its like a scary movie= day of the animals.
Armadillos are notorious for stowing away in loads. Pipe, lumber and anything they can hide in including motors as I have found one in a motor when checking oil at a truckstop in hope Arkansas many years ago around Christmas time. Found him a warm spot while I slept. Unexpected it will scare the crap out of you. I hope to see more species come back especially fish but will take some serious control of how farmers use chemicals and changes in pesticides and herbicides. Plus making sure to leave some habitat. A lot of farmers are doing this already especially pemiscot county and around floodways. We don't realize the value and beauty of these resources til they are gone. They disappear easily but repopulating in most cases takes decades.
Hunter

Campbell, MO

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#17
Jul 6, 2012
 
We have to be really careful about invasive species such as feral hogs and those pesky south American rats that weigh about 25 lbs and are both undermining Texas armadas and Texas. Bounty them before they get here and and hogs now before they become a problem. The nutria is the rat I was talking about. Had a brain fart and couldn't think. Both of these animals are extremely dangerous with no fear of man or pets or livestock.
my2cents

Kennett, MO

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#18
Jul 12, 2012
 
I like the sows. not as gamey tasting. wish I had a place to hunt em
John Shack

Westminster, MD

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#19
Aug 21, 2013
 
Read about turkey vultures. Fascinating creature.
Turkey Vulture Facts - The Turkey Vulture Society

vulturesociety.homestead.com/TVFacts.ht ...

Also, TVs are not capable of carrying off and flying with their prey. That behavior is for eagles and hawks.

However, the TV has something in common with one or two posters on this site; they piss on their feet.
John Shack

Westminster, MD

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#20
Aug 21, 2013
 
Thanks for the informative post. You have moved the "debate" forward.
Hunter wrote:
Your right, they as well as eagles and invasive species such as armadillo,skunk etc have made great comebacks. Invasive species had no trouble either even fire ants and recently I caught a rhinocerous beetle in piggott. Due to product transports cross country and pet release and changing climate. I recall in sixties and seventies very few skunks were here and I have watched the progression of armadillos from around seventy nine at Louisiana/Arkansas border to present day as far north as middle Missouri and Illinois vulture from southwest states to as far north as Minnesota Illinois Indiana just in a span of twenty years or so due mainly to the increase in production of poultry. I in last couple years have sat at poultry factories in northern Kentucky and watched Turkey vultures fight for poultry scraps outside my sleeper while unloading and have to honk horn to get out of truck as they will not move out of your way even running into dogfood docks and grabbing poultry from conveyors next to workers. Like you said I have no trouble identifying them. Featherless heads, coal black feathers with white highlight on underside of six to eight foot wingspan. Look absolutely nothing like a bald eagle. By the way the bald eagle you speak of his common knowledge especially on topix. But last several years bald population has increased exponentially inthis area with several hunting together in fields between Bragg city and braggadocio and several lone eagles hunting the ponds along I 55. There are several nests hidden in Bootheel but I will refrain from telling location as they tend to need and demand solitude when nesting and shouldn't be disturbed. Amatuers or thrill seekers can and do disrupt the nesting cycles of these majestic animals. Try keeping info to yourself on nesting sights for the sakecof the animals. As far as vultures go I have had stowaways in a sealed truck without my knowledge til doors were opened but never a bald eagle. I think I am,as good an expert as anyone at identifying species and have even gotten pretty good at identifying differences in markings and habits not to mention territories of local balds. Think I have the job of identifying under control as I am astounded by great birds of prey from a distance since gamewarden Brooks gave me permission to care for a hawk ixfound injured from pellet gun in kennett about 35 or 40 years ago which gave me a great appreciation of these animals. Been photographing and admiring them ever since and studying habits and territories etc just as a hobby. Rayburn Brooks was a great warden and knew how to promote conservation and interest without being an ass in his job or catering to farmers landowners and the rich. These new wardens could have learned far more from him than state trooper wannabe school. About the animals conservation people and how to create harmony among them so that hunting could be respected and enjoyed without fear of prosecution by overbearing wardens who overstep with control to create revenue and control public land for adjacent landowners. Another corruption that has become prevelant around the area.

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