A recent Ohio Supreme Court case serves as a reminder that lawyers commit misconduct. In Disciplinary Counsel v. Robinson, the Ohio Supreme Court considered the shocking conduct of David Jerome Robinson. Robinson worked for a law firm and its lobbying subsidiary and signed an employment agreement that required him to maintain the confidentiality of all business information. When he sought to move on to greener pastures, Robinson removed seven boxes of materials while the rest of his law firm was at a retreat in Pennsylvania. A few weeks later he was terminated, and not long after that, he was sued by his former firm for breach of contract. During his deposition and courtroom testimony, Robinson testified that he didn't have any client records or law firm information in his possession. During a lunch time recess, Robinson went to the men's restroom, removed a document he had taken from his former firm out of a binder and destroyed it. That evening, he returned home, placed several more boxes in his car and drove across the state of Ohio stopping at various dumpsters to tear up and discard his former firm's confidential documents. Four days later, Robinson must have either concluded that he was going to be caught or he had a sudden rush of conscience because he self-reported his destruction of documents to both his former firm and the court.