NASA: Apollo engines belong to us

Mar 30, 2012 | Posted by: roboblogger | Full story: WAPT-TV Jackson

NASA insisted Friday that it has dibs on rocket engines sitting deep on the Atlantic Ocean floor, a day after a wealthy adventurer announced the discovery of the prized pieces of space history.

Comments
1 - 11 of 11 Comments Last updated Apr 10, 2012

“Failure Is Not An Option”

Since: Feb 12

Enterprise Al

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#1
Mar 30, 2012
 
Well no duh! it was NASA's in the first place do it should be theirs
bruv

Indonesia

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#2
Mar 31, 2012
 
for 40 years the wreck lying deep on the bottom of the sea, no one at nasa cared about it, yet when somebody interested innit, suddenly nasa claims it as theirs. has nasa become a troll now?

“Failure Is Not An Option”

Since: Feb 12

Enterprise Al

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#3
Mar 31, 2012
 
bruv wrote:
for 40 years the wreck lying deep on the bottom of the sea, no one at nasa cared about it, yet when somebody interested innit, suddenly nasa claims it as theirs. has nasa become a troll now?
so? NASA still has ownership
BasicSalt

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#4
Mar 31, 2012
 
They just think they do.
Moliner

Enterprise, AL

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#5
Mar 31, 2012
 
Why wouldn't international salvage laws apply?

“Failure Is Not An Option”

Since: Feb 12

Enterprise Al

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#6
Apr 1, 2012
 
BasicSalt wrote:
They just think they do.
no they have ownership they made it launched it and so they own it, but I doubt it's from Apollo 11 it would be impossible to tell unless they found the entire lower section. Besides they want to put it in the smithsonian do what's the big deal. And just so you trolls know, during the Apollo missions the lower sections of the rocket usually gets partially destroyed because of the atmosphere, and the impact would just rip it apart by itself if they had no parachutes which they didn't. It would be practically impossible to find. But it could be done.
Corvus

Columbus, OH

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#7
Apr 1, 2012
 

Judged:

1

Moliner wrote:
Why wouldn't international salvage laws apply?
International salvage laws are being stood on their head. Recently salvors of Spanish silver and gold coins removed from a wreck were forced by a US court to turn over what they recovered to Spain. All the the expense and risk resulted in a big zero for those who did the work.
BasicSalt

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#8
Apr 1, 2012
 

Judged:

1

1

1

Knowyostuff wrote:
<quoted text>
no they have ownership they made it launched it and so they own it, but I doubt it's from Apollo 11 it would be impossible to tell unless they found the entire lower section.
NASA launched 13 Saturn V's from 1967 to 1973 and all of them flew an eastward trajectory over the Atlantic. But the spacecraft's ultimate destination determines what its azimuth -- or angle of inclination -- will be at launch, and it makes a difference not only whether the ship was headed for Earth orbit or the moon, but precisely where on the surface of (or around) the moon it was going. Thus, Apollo 8's launch azimuth was 72.124 degrees, while Apollo 10's was 72.028, Apollo 11's was 72.058 and so on.

Those fine shavings of a degree make a big difference in determining whether you'll wind up on the Sea of Tranquility or the Fra Mauro highlands, but they can be wiped out completely when a Saturn V's engines are on a chaotic tumble from an altitude of 42 miles up, and most of the first-stage hardware could have thus wound up within pretty much the same Atlantic footprint. It's only the first stage of Apollo 15, with its launch azimuth of 80.088 degrees, and Apollo 17, with its even more sharply angled 91.503, that would likely have landed in a part of the ocean significantly different from the others. http://news.yahoo.com/apollo-11-engines-found...

“Failure Is Not An Option”

Since: Feb 12

Enterprise Al

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#9
Apr 8, 2012
 
BasicSalt wrote:
<quoted text>NASA launched 13 Saturn V's from 1967 to 1973 and all of them flew an eastward trajectory over the Atlantic. But the spacecraft's ultimate destination determines what its azimuth -- or angle of inclination -- will be at launch, and it makes a difference not only whether the ship was headed for Earth orbit or the moon, but precisely where on the surface of (or around) the moon it was going. Thus, Apollo 8's launch azimuth was 72.124 degrees, while Apollo 10's was 72.028, Apollo 11's was 72.058 and so on.

Those fine shavings of a degree make a big difference in determining whether you'll wind up on the Sea of Tranquility or the Fra Mauro highlands, but they can be wiped out completely when a Saturn V's engines are on a chaotic tumble from an altitude of 42 miles up, and most of the first-stage hardware could have thus wound up within pretty much the same Atlantic footprint. It's only the first stage of Apollo 15, with its launch azimuth of 80.088 degrees, and Apollo 17, with its even more sharply angled 91.503, that would likely have landed in a part of the ocean significantly different from the others. http://news.yahoo.com/apollo-11-engines-found...
hey dumbass, why don't you stop trying to be a smart ass what I assay still stands, and Houston controls the azimuth, it's called the roll maneuver. And I am correct all you giving me is a bunch of useless launch facts. What I'm giving you is the truth asshole. The first stage of the Saturn v was meant to bring astronauts into a high earth orbit and using the second stage to take them out of orbit. Which means dumbass the first stage would partially burn because of the atmosphere. And the high velocity and impact with the water would rip the first stage apart at least partially. I know what I'm talking about dumbass that's why I'm down here in JSC and and later going to go into training. I bet you can guess if your actually smart. It's illogical to find all of the first stage together in one piece
Rosco Brown

United States

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#10
Apr 8, 2012
 
Knowyostuff wrote:
<quoted text>
hey dumbass, why don't you stop trying to be a smart ass what I assay still stands, and Houston controls the azimuth, it's called the roll maneuver. And I am correct all you giving me is a bunch of useless launch facts. What I'm giving you is the truth asshole. The first stage of the Saturn v was meant to bring astronauts into a high earth orbit and using the second stage to take them out of orbit. Which means dumbass the first stage would partially burn because of the atmosphere. And the high velocity and impact with the water would rip the first stage apart at least partially. I know what I'm talking about dumbass that's why I'm down here in JSC and and later going to go into training. I bet you can guess if your actually smart. It's illogical to find all of the first stage together in one piece
You are no rocket scientist. You are not much of anything else either. The launch trajectory is programmed into the computer and is dependent on where the spacecraft is going, just like the article says. NASA knows the general location the boosters land. That's part of range safety. The condition of the boosters are not known. You are the only dumb ass here.

“Failure Is Not An Option”

Since: Feb 12

Enterprise Al

|
Report Abuse
|
Judge it!
|
#11
Apr 10, 2012
 
Rosco Brown wrote:
<quoted text>You are no rocket scientist. You are not much of anything else either. The launch trajectory is programmed into the computer and is dependent on where the spacecraft is going, just like the article says. NASA knows the general location the boosters land. That's part of range safety. The condition of the boosters are not known. You are the only dumb ass here.
they know the general location of where the first stage could have landed but any idiot knows there's to many variables to pin point one exact location plus what I said is correct dumbass the first stage would at least get weakened by the atmosphere and the impact would not keep the first stage together. That's why they only found one engine. You are no rocket scientist asshole, I don't see your ass down here in NASA. So why don't you stop trying to be a smart ass and leave this forum.

Tell me when this thread is updated: (Registration is not required)

Add to my Tracker Send me an email

Type in your comments below
Name
(appears on your post)
Comments
Characters left: 4000
Type the numbers you see in the image on the right:

Please note by clicking on "Post Comment" you acknowledge that you have read the Terms of Service and the comment you are posting is in compliance with such terms. Be polite. Inappropriate posts may be removed by the moderator. Send us your feedback.

Other Recent IT Services Discussions

Search the IT Services Forum:
Title Updated Last By Comments
Huntsville PC Repair - www.HuntsvillePCTech.net Jul 23 Sponsored Post 1
A Euro for Your Thoughts Jul 3 Human at Earth 4
SaaS and Cloud ERP Observations: Is Cloud ERP R... (Nov '13) Jun '14 Dimitar 2
Amazon blocking orders of Warner Bros. movies i... Jun '14 Bizarro 1
HP To Cut 24,600 Jobs As Part Of EDS Integration (Sep '08) May '14 Human at Earth 15
briefed on what the CIA was up May '14 Mark 1
Is Amazon ruining dating in Seattle? May '14 dizzyprincess 1
•••
•••